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Jordan Schwall

Student - B.A. Philosophy,

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Is the internet the next conquerable frontier?

We as a people seem to strive to conquer, to be the dominant force, to rule in eminence. As all known physicality has been conquered, is the internet, the intangible community-- with established systemic information exchange-- ripe for development? Is it the most suitable candidate for infrastructural domination?

The internet still lacks so many communal features that one sees in the Aristotelean political state. Does the internet have a constitution of its own? Are there laws and rules specific to the internet, created and promulgated by an ultimate internet authority?

Will it be via political policy, a multi-multi-multi-billion dollar corporation, the continued governance and autonomy that the internet collectively exercises over itself?

Will the next major war be digital-- software as ammunition? Will it eventually all cease as to have the effect of nuclear demolition upon a community?


Please attempt to speak specific to my questions at hand, bringing in (if necessary) only directly related information with reputable citation (if needed).

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  • Feb 11 2013: Maybe this is going a bit far.
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      Feb 13 2013: In which sense? If you are having trouble with the term "conquerable," let me specify. Let's deem conquerable to mean "anything you can exert dominance over." Tech companies seem the most prudent example, so as to say, in terms of market value, Microsoft conquered the tech market last year (http://www.forbes.com/global2000/#p_1_s_a0_Software%20&%20Programming_All%20countries_All%20states_).

      So right now, it looks as if the internet is an economic entity and information exchange--something like a feudal system--in that we occupy gigabytes (land), and in exchange we provide data (a portion of that gigabyte) for others' profit.

      Will there be further infrastructural development? Of course, so long as we consider "infrastructure" to be PCs, mobile devices, and other publicly accessible means of using the internet. Will some entity eventually own all of the rights to the internet on PCs, mobile devices, etc?