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Farokh Shahabi Nezhad

CEO & Co-Founder at Idearun, BipFa

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Is there any way to prevent religious debates from turning into a big fight?

People discuss lots of things, politics, sports, anything
But when they discuss religious opinions, most of the time, they get all angry and try to win even with fight.
why is that? why that can't be a normal subject?
and more important, How can we prevent this?

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Closing Statement from Farokh Shahabi Nezhad

Tnx everyone for their replies. I enjoyed learning from different aspect for this problem.

I can only conclude this : Don't argue with someone unless they are open minded and ready to be changed and challenged.

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  • Feb 18 2013: I don’t think conversations about religion need devolve into fights, but it does require a deeper understanding of religions. Here’s what I mean.

    A complaint I’ve heard about religion is that it must be understood as a set of literal guidelines for human belief. The criticism presumes that religions require their followers to blindly hold to dogma as a strict set of one to one of facts in order to be consistent. Since these religions are usually held within an antiquated and stifling cosmology, they end up being culturally destructive, intellectually stultifying, and spiritually desultory because they achieve little beyond chasing after their own shadows and delusions.

    It’s under this pallor that religion is often criticized. I recognize how this sort of criticism comes about, but I think religion (as a whole, anyway) is different from this.

    For one thing, I think the failure of some religions isn’t an indictment of religion wholly so much an example of religious morbidity. Religions live by struggling perpetually to continue speaking meaningfully in a changing world, a struggle they often fail at. But these struggles are not condemnations of religion so much as natural challenges faced by religion simply being itself. Fundamentalism is more religion’s sick face than its true face.

    Even more than this though, I see religion as a way of being conscious of the universe in it’s totality. It comes from the radically narrative and lyrical character of our mind’s arrangement and production of meaning, and is inescapable. In fact, provided we are able to think about religion in a functional and fruitful way, I see very little reason why we should ever want to do away with it. Our religious consciousness is a basic part of what we are, existentially speaking, as thinking and caring beings. The inescapability of religion (and more specifically religious consciousness) is precisely why we must look to understand religion in all its trappings; something to do deeply & well.
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      Feb 19 2013: ..."Our religious consciousness is a basic part of what we are, existentially speaking, as thinking and caring beings. The inescapability of religion (and more specifically religious consciousness) is precisely why we must look to understand religion in all its trappings; something to do deeply & well."

      Your words remind me of what Jesus himself some 2000 years ago said on his sermon on the mt of olives "Happy are those conscious of their spiritual need" (Matthew 5:3). We all have a spiritual need. But many fail to pay attention to it. I don't think we have a religious need.

      The religions created by men....the wanting to control the masses through laws and rules and mystique, have caused nothing but division and war.



      They use spirituality and religion interchangeably.
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      Feb 20 2013: Its a good point Seth.

      Dogmatic religious beliefs are somewhat different to more holistic views.

      As a skeptic I find beliefs with lots of specifics such as who to kill and what to eat harder to justify than a Deistic approach. But see no proof for any deity and am suspect of the interpretations attached to many of our human experiences.

      You know they still kill people they claim are witches in Africa and Papua New Guinea when someone gets sick etc.

      Ignorance, intuition, superstition, spirituality, neurological experiences and the follies of the human mind etc without evidence can lead to lots of interesting beliefs and questionable actions. Others are more benign, especially if you grow up in a culture that is more developed in terms of human rights, scientific education, separation of church and state, not indoctrinating children in religious type beliefs etc.

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