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Farokh Shahabi Nezhad

CEO & Co-Founder at Idearun, TEDxTehran

TEDCRED 20+

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Is there any way to prevent religious debates from turning into a big fight?

People discuss lots of things, politics, sports, anything
But when they discuss religious opinions, most of the time, they get all angry and try to win even with fight.
why is that? why that can't be a normal subject?
and more important, How can we prevent this?

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Closing Statement from Farokh Shahabi Nezhad

Tnx everyone for their replies. I enjoyed learning from different aspect for this problem.

I can only conclude this : Don't argue with someone unless they are open minded and ready to be changed and challenged.

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    Feb 18 2013: One's religion is usually very close to one's heart. It is defining of them whether they are "devout" or not. With that being said, debating religion is more of a debate of competing identities. Any commentary that opposes that identity makes people feel unsafe. More than an idea is challenged, but rather, self. Therefore, people become incredibly defensive of their religion, and a normal discussion can quickly escalate into a verbal, or physical, brawl. They try and win because that is the only way that their identity can be made safe and stable.

    That being said, I believe it is extremely important to discuss religion. It is one of the best ways of learning about other cultures and other people. What do they hold dear? What do they exalt? What is sacred? These are all important questions, and when accompanied with a "why" lead into a path of discovery that is quite exhilarating.

    However, the only way to accomplish this is through maturity. It must be learned that it is not good to try and "disprove" someone's religion, but rather have a discussion of the differences, and why they exist. It must nor be a debate about religion, but a discussion of religion.

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