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David Hamilton

TEDCRED 50+

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Could we orbit a telescopic satellite 1 light hour above the earth, and use it to zoom in on crimes, after the fact?

Just an odd thought... I assume it would be too far to get a clear image... but we are getting much better at that sort of thing...

Could we see if someone was really defending themselves in an infrared shot? A getaway vehicle? Or, is that too far to have any predictable orbit or make out something so small?

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    Jan 30 2013: wow, that idea so does not work for many reasons. you didn't do any research, did you?

    first thing to research is how long is one light hour
    second thing to research is how far the earth from the sun, and which planet is 1lh far
    third thing to research is what is the highest orbit around the earth (hill sphere)
    fourth thing to research is what spatial resolution would the most advanced telescope has, from it's angular resolution and the distance

    in short: nope.
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      Jan 30 2013: Yup... Didn't even think about it for 2 minutes before posting... just knew something about it was impossible, and something about it was interesting. Impossible... both the orbit concept, and the concept of communicating with something faster than the light on earth changes.

      Interesting... Our cameras are so good, and record so much information now, that you can use programs to actually zoom into their images, after the fact... So, it doesn't need to be a light hour away... It just needs to be taking the most detailed photo of Los Angeles (or whatever city it is designed for), every second... then law enforcement can zoom into the time and place of the crime, after the fact... and possible see a vehicle.

      Infrared for determining self defense is probably still a dream, especially on multi floor buildings... but moore's law + great optics, and you never know.

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