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Jamie Hume

Artist - Creative Catalyst and Consciousness Expansion Specialis,

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How much do you know about First Nations Treaties and the Crown?

Generally speaking, First Nations treaties with the Crown of Canada seem like something mythical and in the distant past. They are however, very current and in the here and now however. That vague sense of obscurity has been and still is cultivated by a lack of intention by government and a misrepresentation of the facts through education. Some improvement has been achieved in the education system, but more needs to be done and that does not address several generations of lack of and or distorted information instilled in the general Canadian public.
So, rather than discussing whether these treaties are relevant or not, I would like to begin the discussion with the question... what do you, know about the treaties between First Nations and the Crown of Canada? We are all treaty people and we all have some responsibility to be informed.

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    Jan 30 2013: Idle No More has become a profoundly inspirational movement to many people here in Canada, both aboriginal and non-aboriginal. A major issue people are struck with in the movement is lack of knowledge about the issues amongst the general public and even our federal and provincial governments. Thus, I was inspired to ask the above question and see what happens,
    • Feb 2 2013: In part I think Idle No More is amazing however I am disappointed that a female figure came forward to start the movement and then was shown to have mishandled money. I am female and well it would have been wonderful to see a better mentor come forward regardless of the fact that her people support the money she spent, I still feel a better example could have led the movement.
      • Feb 17 2013: Chief Spence did not start the Idle No More movement. Four FN women in Saskatchewan did. Their primary message was that the police were not doing enough to solve the hundreds of FN women who have gone missing. And to protest the government's focus on moving Canada to be a major exporter of our coal, oil and gas resources.

        FN in the North already are aware of the environmental effects of the oil sands and fracking and most do not support the huge expansion of the pipelines. This is their home lands while most people are in cities and towns away from the fields. Urban people do not see the devastation caused. Leaks DO happen.

        Idle No More became a movement for all the environmental and political issues that the First Nations face. I am Metis (now Indian...but that will probably change again as is under Federal appeal). I do not suffer the political restrictions imposed on First Nations on reserve but am very familiar with the issues and support my cousins fully.

        You don't need to be First Nations to want clean water, clean air and an habitable planet for your children. It is in the culture of First Nations people to think of important issues in terms of 7 Generations. That is far more important than current short term economics or politics. The selfishness of past generations have brought us to this, now it is up to all of us, now, to make positive change.
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        Feb 20 2013: I doubt it that the four women had any idea how what they started would go viral and wake up the peoples and there is something right them being women, in my culture though it is us men who are most vocal, it's our girls who tell us what to say as they gage a room full of people better, but then when you have a room full of women all eyeing each other then the public talks can get interesting as their husbands start the dance of the talk.
        • Feb 20 2013: Yes Ken we just finished a four day fireside vigil for a noted woman in our community who passed away last week and it was the women who guarded the fire throughout those four days often it is the men who do this all in all it was very sacred and an honor to have been a part of this ceremony I appreciate your input :)

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