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greg dahlen

Alumnus, academy of achievement

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How does it feel to live in a "flyover state"?

Some people say life in the U.S. is most exciting on the coasts, East Coast and West Coast, and they jokingly call the other states "the flyover states," meaning they're not too exciting and you just fly over them as you go back and forth between the coasts. For those of you living in "the flyover states," is this a fair characterization? How does it feel to live there? For people on the coasts, is your life more exciting?

For people in other countries, is there a similar division, that life is considered most exciting on the coasts?

I live right on the edge of Los Angeles, and I'm kind of torn. Part of me thinks it's pretty exciting to live anywhere. Another part just loves L.A., feels like it's the only interesting place to live on Earth.

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  • Jan 26 2013: It feels OK Greg. Some people like excitement? Where there is plenty wherever you live! There are people who are happy and satisfied to live in states-regions between coasts. One could learn alot by driving between coasts and stopping along the way to view new scenes and to chuckle with the locals!

    Do people of coast states think less of people in other states? The "jokingly" comments suggests ignorance of what is between the coasts and it smacks of smugness. ! I drove my car from the Mid-West of USA to three west coast states and back a few years ago and that was the most rewarding vacation ever! I saw much to be excited about. Those persons who live between coasts have nothing about their location to be ashamed. The "coastal folks need the mid-states' votes to get anything done, and their money, and their friendship, and more.
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      Jan 26 2013: Yeah, Mark, after I wrote this question, I realized we have another nickname for the inner states, "the heartland." That's much more flattering.

      As I wrote to Kate above, I think much of the stimulation people associate with coasts is the ports, seaports and airports, for they bring in people and goods from farflung places, and along with the people and goods come new ideas and ways of looking at the world. Do you think there's any sort of excitement that is unique to the non-coast states, something that they have that the coasters don't?

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