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Me,

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Is there a parallel in the human reaction to color as there is in the reaction to their corresponding acoustic frequencies?

This summer I stumbled over the realization that the equal-tempered acoustic scale fits very neatly into the visual spectrum of light. ... Too neatly. I mean that, when converted from Hz into wavelength, acoustic tones have one corresponding color: (rougly) F2 - violet; E2 - edging on dark blue; D2 - baby blue; C2- Kelly-ish green; B1 - light yellow; A - orange; G - red).

Now I'm beginning to consider that perhaps the two - light and sound - may have other parallels. Based on what you know about how color affects human behavior, is there any evidence to suggest that the same affect happens with that color's corresponding acoustic note? (and vice versa)

EXAMPLE: If we now that the color red is known to make consumers hungry, does a G have a similar effect on people?

Please expand this topic.

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  • Jan 23 2013: Interesting hyphothesis although I wasn't aware of any crossover in the brain for audio and video analysis.
    Also, your assumption of the relationship between colours and sounds may not be the direct one that you propose.
    For instance, I am a fan of G but not Red. To me G is more of a Green and Bflat is Blue, ESharp is definetly Red.
    Also, from an accoustical point of view, we appreciate combinations of sounds (chords, progressions and particularly resolutions) I have never considered the same blending of colours to have the same effect.
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      Jan 24 2013: I have been undertaking much reading that examines synaesthesia - the relationship people make between two senses. Some are born with a savant-like tendency to relate one to the other (i.e. using colors to do math) while others can develop it throughout their lives and journeys in music - interestingly, particularly music.

      Also, you're right - the harmonics of the audible spectrum doesn't transcribe at all when considering the visual spectrum.

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