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Solving gun violence in the US in today's insane political climate requires a solution that makes it painless for everyone.

First that this idea even needs to be broached in the first place is ridiculous especially given the lack of clarity in the second amendment (eg it does not specify types of arms so that should be handled by laws not as a "do what you will free for all").

That said it seems there are some major elements that would be necessary to reduce gun deaths in the US and there are some obfuscating interests embodied in the NRA that must be sidestepped or accommodated in the solution.

Four main areas of focus jump out to reduce gun deaths:

1) "mass killings" (included in this would be the 2 or 3 person shootings as well as as Newtown or Aurora types)
2) Accidental shootings
3) Non-owner shootings (eg the shooter is not the owner of the gun)
4) "black market" trading

Added to these I would say the parameter that makes gun control legislation difficult is gun manufacturer revenue stream protection using the second amendment as a shill.

So what are the necessary parameters to make something happen vs. the absurdity of what is going to happen over the next few months in Washington:

1) Figure out a way that shifting policy creates more revenue for gun manufacturers so they get the NRA on board
2) Make sure that guns cannot be used in public places or by someone other than their owner

The Idea - Mandatory gun locks and universal kill switches.

On locks, all responsible gun owners have gun safes. Why not move the lock to the gun's trigger mechanism either with a combination code or biometric locks. That would prevent unauthorized use of the gun by anyone but the owner.

On kill switches, in the same locking mechanism put a chip and actuator that freezes the locking mechanism mentioned above when it receives a certain modulated radio signal.

If mandatory then all existing guns will have to be refitted with the new bolt mechanism creating revenue streams for the gun manufacturers and on all new guns they can charge more creating more revenue.

Thoughts?

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    Feb 4 2013: Hi Morgan,
    Since this happened just down the road, so to speak, there is a lot of information from local sources as of now, the story is that the vet's mother had concerns about his actions since he returned from service. The vet didn't seek help from military medical sources, so there is no medical records to address his mental state. The mother knew of Chris and local information on how he has helped vets with problems so she contacted him to help her son. And the situation went down from there. The is a huge Military Medical Center here and the consensus is that this action has all the earmarks of PTSD.

    Now here is the thing I don't understand. In the old days, as in my youth, soldiers suffered from combat fatigue. There has been cases of this problem in subsequent wars. What disturbs me is that there seems to be a greater number of soldiers falling to this disorder. Is there something that effects young men today to be more subject to this mental disorder? I know there has been focus on the individuals but I haven't heard much of examination, a why, on the global scale.
    There was a report here recently that our soldiers are commuting suicide as a greater rate then ever. the military is taking steps to address this issue to stop it but I wonder why is it happening in the first place.
    When asked about the why, the response has been, "well, they were in a war" ... that doesn't address the increase. Why?
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      Feb 4 2013: I read an interesting report that the reason for the higher rates of PTSD and suicide is realted to violent video games and also the use of simulators.
      The problem is causing a pysch phenomenon where in playing of these games the line between reality and fantasy blurs.
      The fact you can kill 900 people in a video game get killed and come back to do it again seems to seep into the subconcious.
      So young people are signing up thinking they will do their 6-12 months tour and it will be a walk in the park

      .Unfortunately war is not like a video game you don't get extra lives so when reality sets in and they see the aftermath in real life they can't cope.

      The other problem I believe is that Veterans Affairs are hard pressed to keep up with pysch evaluations of returning and the following up of demobbed soldiers and their welfare, the resources just arn't there, so they are slipping through the cracks.
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        Feb 5 2013: Hi Morgan,
        I think you have better insight on this problem then most of us here. Further, your note on the VA is right on. I have some problems that are attributed to my exposure to herbicides during my Viet Nam experience. I got a letter acknowledging my situation and gave me a 60 month
        time frame for resolution. I can believe that people with real problems are not getting the timely help they need.
      • Feb 5 2013: Is it also possible that the amount of PTSD and combat fatigue (same thing just different words) hasn't increased at all? Population and media coverage has increased dramatically over the years. Maybe we're just informed about it more than society used to be?

        As far as video games being the cause of anything, I personally see that as an easy way out to answer serious questions. I'm personally a gamer and I feel they allow me to get the frustration and anger out in a safe and sane manner from all stresses of life (whether it be a combat, sports, or fantasy style game). But that's me. I don't know how others deal with combat style games.

        The VA is definitely overwhelmed. Vet here also but not from Nam. Thank you for your service Mr. Colera and good luck with dealing with the VA grind.
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          Feb 5 2013: This was a study done by a military headshrinker came across it while researching something else in PTSD and found it interesting and they were finding larger than usual cases.

          But that may also be because a lot of your units have done multiple tours as well and also I believe a lot of National guard units were thrown in to give regular units a break.

          Can't remember were this was a couple of years ago but I'm sure if you google it, the article will manifest that's how I found it.
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          Feb 6 2013: Hi Morgan,
          An update on the that vet shooting in Texas, now they are not sure that the shooter has PTSD, He may be a sociopath.
          I have thoughts on the effects of gaming on the combat vet and a perceived increase in PTSD. I don't know if anyone has really looked into it. But I've got to think that gamers playing many hours a day on a combat game and going out for party after are not mentally really for the actual noise, smell, and fear they'll find in real combat. A retired combat NCO I know tells the story of his experience in a small town in Afghanistan under fire. His young officer said to him " this was a lot easier on my xbox"
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      Feb 6 2013: Mike,Shawn,Morgan,you all speak from experience of how gun culture is failing to assist you,or your children . I applaud your honesty...but you fail to name anyone responsible,just general references, You must admit in your group,there is a serious rigidity of protocol that does not let you reveal when there are serious problems...honor and secrecy.....A code of conduct,that works well when everything is legitemate,and when there is a problem..you cannot tell anyone but your immediate superior.So people unqualified to be present,or make judgements,or are unfit are not outed..they remain amongst you. I worked 0on a base with a serial Killer who was the base commendant...I am fully aware how he evaded suspicion,...so now what...Public Opinion is swaying against you,your industry fails to get rid of those who are ruining your image,,,,now what?
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        Feb 6 2013: Sorry Carolyn I don't quite get what you are trying say,

        this has become more of a cultural thing were people have been allowed to take a statute within the Constitution of their country and the people have been allowed to interpret it the way they will, without it being updated to move with the times. At the same time certain groups have been allowed to profit and have instilled that culture into the psyche.

        There are too many people who could be charged with lack of responsibility and too many mitigating circumstances that surround the subject that have also been allowed to lapse or deteriorate over time such as mental health and healthcare in general.

        Is that on the right track or to general????
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          Feb 6 2013: correct,wellsaid.And yet,lets say this was a criminal series of acts in some levels,in Government,or wiithin another instituion,religion,or agriculture...has this all become instituions that are too big to fail? Or police their own halls. If so ,may I inquire ,would the instituion, similar to Wikileaks now become the evil rupture...when this is a very serious problem?Each of these instituions has slowly allowed it poison to touch the roots of society.,or CHILDREN.Now the cultures have decided they are more relevant then all children(not their own) I understand at some level why some evade exposure...but from a warrior class,who risk death.....this relationship exposes man to the most fundementa lanswers of all,the divide between what is animated,and what is without this energy,we call life. In order to excell at the job,you have to bridge the gap with a deal with life itself. That event,gives life more meaning..warrior classe shave this opportunity..Speak clearly about the bridge,this will eliminate thrill seekers,and all those who fail to take on the burden. Society needs to know when individuals are missing the mark..dont hide them,they are not suited. If doctors must be cautious in their speech about their craft and laywers,and millions of shop owners,cna you not reinspire your friends to speak with a serious tone and dismiss the illusion of Guns are for everyone...not everyone is qualified to be a dentist and yet I may go to one...The right to bear arms,has failed to produce a culture that is realistic about death,and yet sadly I feel without it,they accidently are now causing their own suffering. Is the relationship in kill culture that it makes with death..one that is something that should remain more hidden,then the barroom brawl scenes or guys smiling with weapons that is presented to American culture.?
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          Feb 6 2013: The 2nd amendment is timeless... If it is no longer necessary, it will change in that time. It will naturally be forgotten. There is no need to force a change.
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        Feb 6 2013: Hi Carolyn
        I think you are elevating this situation to a level higher then what it is. Let us look at gun owners, they are not a specific class. They come from all walks of life. Only maybe 20% of them are regular hunters. Maybe another 20% use their guns for recreational purposes. The rest of them look upon their guns as an insurance policy, for personal protection, property protection or on the most remote chance a need to defend their United States. Most never fire their guns. These are the legal gun owners.
        Then we have the illegal users. They come from all walks of life. These are sociopaths, gang members, drug dealers, murderers, robbers, etc. They use guns to commit violent acts on others.
        I have been disturbed about all the current commotion on "gun control" as most all the focus has been on legal gun holders. They are talking about doing something about the mentally disturbed, but..
        Almost nothing about the biggest problems with gun violence in our big city streets. Information from that group of illegal "gun users" tells us that less the 2% of those guns are legally gotten. Most are bought on the street and many of those come from robberies of legitimate gun owners.
        When you get more jail time for writing a bad check then shooting up a neighborhood street leads me to believe we have more problems then registering legal gun owners.
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        Feb 6 2013: @ Gary,

        The Second Amendment maybe timeless but it is antiquated and needs to bought screaming into the 21st century

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