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Mathew Naismith

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Is hydraulic fracturing the answer especially when you take in consideration the environmental impact it is having?

Hydraulic fracturing is polluting the underground water which comes up through the cracks caused by the fracturing of the rock & ends up in our water ways. I think we have enough pollutants to deal with above & below the ground now!!

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    Jan 18 2013: G’day TED Community

    I know someone personally who has developed a fully working power plant driven by cold fusion but his not happy with it at the moment because he thinks he can make it a lot more efficient through the setup of the electronics that drive this device & I’m not lying. The biggest problem he’s got however once installed it won’t produce any further revenue back into the economy accept through breakdowns. I told him to sell it to the Chinese at least they will produce them instead of burying them or burying him which has happenedwith others.

    I know there are a number of people out there that are probably paid to make these accusations look fraudulent but the truth is still getting out there as there are so many clean energy devices that have been squashed by the big boys for a good reason of course mainly because they would be missing out on ongoing revenue themselves.

    Love
    Mathew
    • Jan 18 2013: "The biggest problem he’s got however once installed it won’t produce any further revenue back into the economy accept through breakdowns"

      Unless it is made of magicanium, the device will have a capital equipment cost, maintenance cost, and a lifetime (for gen usually 20-25 years). Depending on its cost amortized over power production it may or may not be able to compete with NG. If it can compete with NG on power density (this is highly unlikely and is the main competitive parameter) and price and availability of resource (the elements that enable the fusion reaction) then it will have no problem getting into the marketplace once a fully operational prototype is built and third party tested.
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        Jan 18 2013: G’day Rob

        It sounds like a joke but it’s not as it actually works but not to the point he would like it too, I don’t understand it at all but the amount of energy that is put into the device to run it in the first place is insignificant to its output, it has something to do with something going up & down instead of around but when it goes up & down it loops as well.

        Putting it on the market, could you imagine what that would do to the economy & they won’t have that. I think I better shut up.

        Love
        Mathew
        • Jan 18 2013: actually I can imagine. how ever well it performs it will have a cost of energy (cost of the machine amortised over lifetime of machine + annual operating expense * fixed charge rate / annual energy production). which will be marked up by the utilities. utilities will make about the same profit so they are fine with it. companies and individuals will be able to buy more power and consume and produce more stuff. it would lead to econo mic growth and a general increase in the standard of living which means more growth. it would be very beneficial if managed properly, eg the wealth created was not unevenly distributed which has been a problem recently. anyway overall everyone's or the "special" fews boat rises so it is a net gain. there is no reason for any stakeholders to be against it in the power generation market of the market in general. it is a win win.

          that said the key parameters of success are the levelised cost and the power density. and the power density will determine where it can be located and how much additional transmission cost is involved. that will determine whether it can take market share from natural gas. it will only take share if the combined cost of energy and transmission is less than natural gas. before fracking natural gas was dominating the market. it is all about final cost.
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      Jan 18 2013: Mathew,
      Did you understand what you wrote? A cold fusion generator? That invention has escaped some of the greatest minds in physics for 100 years, but your friend has done it.
      His biggest worry is about the revenue generation once it's online?
      Tell him not to worry. Have him contact me. I will be his agent for 10%. I will deal with all those big boys out to squash him. When we are done, I will be one of the wealthiest men in the world and he...will be a god.
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        Jan 18 2013: G’day Mike

        How are you going to stop the big boys even if you were one yourself you couldn’t stop the rest.

        This person is quite clever but he did stumble upon this by accident in around about way. In writing such a strange reply I would say you don’t believe me & guess what so what!!

        Love
        Mathew
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          Jan 19 2013: Mathew,
          Are you kidding me? Since those two weenies back in the late 80s found you can get electron flow from Palladium and Hydrogen based there has been all matter of people looking at the problem. Even the US Navy has done a lot of research. The problem has been in the research that the outcomes have been inconsistent if at all. And you say your friend has the system ready for commercial use? It is not about my belief system. It's about credulity. There has to be thousands of people in Australia that can do what I proposed to do.
      • Jan 18 2013: actually there is a prof at MIT that has repeated the results of the original experiments but with a different set of elements. he figured it would take about 10 years and a couple of bil to get it to commercial readiness. You can see why he is skeptical. big boys do not care. they will get their piece of the pie. as a matter of fact sign Mike because every major industrial products company would be lining up to invest if it has a low total cost. do you have any idea what the delivered cost per kWh is? if it is not around $.07-.08 per kWh it is a non-starter, but some investors might want to see if it can be brought forward. until you have an idea of delivered cost this is all just wool gathering.

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