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Melissa Seideman

Teacher,

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Direct popular vote should replace the Electoral College.

Please state your opinion here about this debate and respond to one other person.

Pro- Lindy and Miranda
Con- Claudia and Caitriona

Debate is on Thursday.

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  • Jan 2 2013: I'm Thomas Califano. I couldn't log in, so I'm stealing Koval's thing. Here's mah response:
    The electoral college is very important in our country in that in ensures that, regardless of what the mindless sheep who vote may think is good for the country, there are educated citizens with actually stakes in the government who have a better chance of putting the best guy in charge. If I had my way, we’d use the idea proposed by Alexander Hamilton, where only the people with legitimate stakes in the government can vote. This would ensure that people stay informed and actually learn about the candidates and the issues. Quite frankly, the opinions of the people who know nothing about politics and see voting as a chore are not important and should not be considered serious, as they can greatly influence the country without even knowing why they’re voting for who they’re voting for, or what he even really stands for.
    • Jan 2 2013: I agree, Thomas. The College allows for a better body of people electing the President.
      • Jan 3 2013: The electors now are dedicated party activists of the winning party who meet briefly in mid-December to cast their totally predictable rubberstamped votes in accordance with their pre-announced pledges.

        The current system does not provide some kind of check on the "mobs." There have been 22,453 electoral votes cast since presidential elections became competitive (in 1796), and only 17 have been cast for someone other than the candidate nominated by the elector's own political party. 1796 remains the only instance when the elector might have thought, at the time he voted, that his vote might affect the national outcome. Since 1796, the Electoral College has had the form, but not the substance, of the deliberative body envisioned by the Founders.

        The National Popular Vote bill would end the disproportionate attention and influence of the "mob" in the current handful of closely divided battleground states, such as Florida, while the "mobs" of the vast majority of states are ignored. 9 states determined the 2012 election. 10 of the original 13 states are politically irrelevant in presidential campaigns now. Four out of five Americans were ignored in the 2012 presidential election. After being nominated, Obama visited just eight closely divided battleground states, and Romney visited only 10. These 10 states accounted for 98% of the $940 million spent on campaign advertising.
    • Jan 2 2013: The current system does not provide some kind of check on the "mobs." There have been 22,453 electoral votes cast since presidential elections became competitive (in 1796), and only 17 have been cast for someone other than the candidate nominated by the elector's own political party. 1796 remains the only instance when the elector might have thought, at the time he voted, that his vote might affect the national outcome. Since 1796, the Electoral College has had the form, but not the substance, of the deliberative body envisioned by the Founders. The electors now are dedicated party activists of the winning party who meet briefly in mid-December to cast their totally predictable rubberstamped votes in accordance with their pre-announced pledges.

      If a Democratic presidential candidate receives the most votes, the state's dedicated Democratic party activists who have been chosen as its slate of electors become the Electoral College voting bloc. If a Republican presidential candidate receives the most votes, the state's dedicated Republican party activists who have been chosen as its slate of electors become the Electoral College voting bloc. The winner of the presidential election is the candidate who collects 270 votes from Electoral College voters from among the winning party's dedicated activists.

      The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld state laws guaranteeing faithful voting by presidential electors (because the states have plenary power over presidential electors).
    • Jan 3 2013: Thomas, I strongly feel that your view over this subject is exceptionally valid. Even though we have conflicting political views, I concur with your argument.

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