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Gabriella Araimo

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A school where fees depend on wealth,where students can borrow books instead of buying them and learn through games,music,acting and debates

A new high school for Italy ( and the world):
1. You have to pay a school fee depending on how much money you have, but you don't have to buy any book or computer because the school lend them you
2. Every subject is teached in a more interesting way: maths through games, physics and biology through experiments ,languages through music and acting, history and philosophy through reading and debates, art through practice
3.Each classroom has two teachers: one is older and/or with more experience and another one is younger and/or more enthusiastic, one teaches practice and another one explains theory, an actor or a musician work swith a language teacher; this help students also dealing with two different points of view in every situation
4. There are lessons in the afternoon, so students who live far from the school will eat at the school canteen
5. Each two weeks there will be a test or a lesson made by groups of students who have worked together on a specific topic
These are examples of school days:
Monday:
8:00-10:00 French and acting, break, 10:15- 12:15 History, Philosophy , documentary and debate, break, 12:30- 13:30 current affairs, break and lunch, 15:00- 16:30 sport, break, 16:45- 18:15 homework of a subject studied in the morning (some teachers help the students that have difficulties), end of the lessons ( no homework at home!)
Tuesday ( same timetable):
Maths and games, break, physics and experiments, break, latin, break and lunch, art and painting, homework, home
Wednesday:
English and music, break, Biology, Chemistry and open-air lessons, break, informatic, break and lunch, sport, homework, home
My purpose is to create a high school that prepares not only for University, but also for social life. What is your opinion?

Topics: education
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Closing Statement from Gabriella Araimo

I want to thank each of you for the precious, interesting and appropriate contributions that opened my eyes and made me more conscious of the problems of any education system. First of all, the funding problem, the difficulty in convincing governments to invest in school expecially during a period of crisis. Second, the natural differences among human intelligences, interests and aptitudes. Third, vandalism. Fourth, the risk that an emphasis on debate can encourage students to find strong arguments to win rather than to understand.
However, some of us have proposed practical solutions, others have shaped their personal experience, others have simply appreciated (the no homework aspect, for example). All of these things make me hope in the future: answers are only to be found. Godspeed to everyone!

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  • Jan 11 2013: I definitely agree with the no homework aspect. The way I see it, we spend so much time on our homework after school that it cuts into our sleep hours. Then the next day at school, we cannot focus as well because we are too tired. Studies have shown that people do not learn as well when they are tired. If we had no homework, we would be able to focus better in class, thus learning in class what we would have had to struggle with as homework. I also think that people nowadays don't learn in the linear fashion that is still being used. People want it to apply to their lives and be interesting. We should be able to learn in a more creative way. Great idea Gabriella!!
    • Jan 13 2013: The greatest challenge with homework is not the work itself. It is the time management issue. If you want to get your homework done, you plan for it. Then you stick to that plan and get it done.

      I recently had this discussion with my students about getting the work done. They self-admitted that the lack of sleep issue had little to do with their homework. The great majority of it was that they were on Facebook, Skype, playing games, texting, or doing any number of other distracting behaviors that limited their ability to complete their work. You can not effectively multi-task. The human brain is not geared for it. Again, students were reporting this to me in a discussion. And they recognized the problem, and did not wish to do anything about it.

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