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James Murray

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Should people who are not Christian celebrate Christmas?

I tire of people who claim they are atheists and non Christians celebrating Christmas, it is hypocritical to the point you are not even permitted to mention the name of the Messiah without being told to stop "being a bore". The only reason Christmas exists is to celebrate the birth of Christ (yes I bloody know the date was changed) so why do people insist on changing the name of the festival to "Xmas" and try to remove religion from it?
These ignorant shallow people can find other festivals with which to explore their boring conformist ideals. Christmas is for the Christians, it brings non Christians together also and that is the beauty of it but stop trying to steal it to suit commercialism.

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    Dec 27 2012: RE: The only reason Christmas exists is to celebrate the birth of Christ, so why do people insist on changing the name of the festival to "Xmas" and try to remove religion from it?

    What exactly do you mean by celebrate? How do you "celebrate" the day?
    It was originally only a "mass," "Mass" is one of the names by which the sacrament of the Eucharist goes by.

    The Roman Catholic Church distinguishes between the Mass in its understanding and what some Anglicans and Lutherans call the Mass, since it considers that they lack the sacrament of orders and therefore "have not preserved the genuine and total reality of the Eucharistic mystery." On the other hand, historically, the Lutheran Church has stated that the Lutheran Mass is "the only Mass founded in the Scriptures of God, in accordance with the plain and incontestable institution of the Saviour..

    "Christmas" is a compound word originating in the term "Christ's Mass". It is derived from the Middle English Cristemasse, which is from Old English Crīstesmæsse, a phrase first recorded in 1038.

    "Xmas" is an abbreviation of Christmas found particularly in print, based on the initial letter chi (Χ) in Greek Khrīstos (Χριστός), "Christ", though numerous style guides discourage its use; it has precedent in Middle English Χρ̄es masse (where "Χρ̄" is an abbreviation for Χριστός).

    You might also read this: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-1100842/Why-I-celebrate-Christmas-worlds-famous-atheist.html

    You asked a question. It seems you are not please with the answer.

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