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Democracy - The most inefficient type of government?

I look at general masses of people, what they do, how they think, how easily they are manipulated, and how clueless they can be. I often wonder how people can be so ignorant! And this got me to think "if the masses are so ignorant and so easy to manipulate, why do they select our leaders?" Well this brought me to another point, is democracy really an efficient form of government if its people are ignorant?

We are prisoners of democracy. If you are on the opposing view of the masses and unable to convince the needed majority, then you effectively have no say, even if you are correct.

This wouldn't be a problem except that it seems that people, now more than ever, are suckers of propaganda, rumors, and biased news. If the masses don't understand what they are voting for and are so easily swayed, how can we still consider democracy a superior system of government?

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    Dec 24 2012: I have never experienced a national democracy or a national anarchy, but I suspect anarchy would be markedly less efficient than democracy. I base this on the many experiences I have had on the much smaller scale of social and business interactions. Thank you!
    • Dec 24 2012: Well, a true democracy would be inefficient because every issue would have to be votes on by everyon eligible and willing to vote. Of course not many countries use a true democracy.
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      Dec 24 2012: what experiences?
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        Dec 24 2012: For example: A group of four couples trying to decide which restaurant to go to; Anarchy sends everyone to different places according to their free-will, uninfluenced choices; Democracy lets the night be spent discussing and debating the best choices with a decision, possibly, never being reached; A Representative Republic allows everyone to go enjoy dinner together wherever their designated expert says.

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