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Build peace: be on time

My Mom and Dad had written a few words on a paper and hung it on the wall in our kitchen. We grew up watching our parents invite all kinds of people into our home for dinners. Strangers. This included any person who was lost in the airport or someone they found lost on the street....A warm meal, pajamas, a clean bed in the guest room, a bathroom, and the next day after breakfast, often supplied with a gift (usually a sweater or socks), and a map they provided a ride to the train or bus station. Most of those people spoke a foreign tongue that none of us understood. But at the end of Mom and Dad's "hospitality adventure" my parents had added a line to their list on the wall and that person had walked away with theirs. To this day my family receives letters and visits from those travelers and their children and even grand children. Every time we gather together there is “letter” readings and....tears of joy.


The paper on the wall read:

Italian: Ti Amo
German: Ich Liebe Dich
Japanese: Ai Shite Imasu
Chinese: Wo Ai Ni
Swedish: Jag Alskar Dig
Greek: S'Agapo
Hawaiian: Aloha Wau La Oe
Irish: Thaim In Grabh Leat
Hebrew: Ani Ohev Otakh
Persian: Du Stet Daaram
Russian: Ya Lyublyu Tyebya
Albanian: Une Te Dua
Finnish: Mina Rakkastan Sinua
Turkish: Seni Seviyorum
Hungarian: Se Ret Lay
Maltese: Jien Inhobbok
Catalan: Testimo Molt
French: Je t'aime
Spanish: Te Amo
Eskimo: Nagligivaget
English: I love you

Now I wish my parents had learned to say " We love you" instead.
Will you help me rewrite this list and include your language too ??

~~ With Happy New Year Wishes~~

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    Jan 21 2013: CREDITS - ' building peace : be on time - We Love You’. Ronny Edry, Elizabeth Gu, Matthew Kwong, Kate Blake, Abdelbari Khiar, Atalay Ata, Tamas Szulman, William Sager, Mari Hethcoat, Amirpouya Ghaemiyan, Jasmin Yaya, Frans Kellner, Feyisayo Anjorin, Lejan, Xavier Belvemont, Etsuko Sai, César Tommasi, Nikolaj Lyngbye Rasmussen, Helge Hasvold, Juliette Zahn.
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    Jan 4 2013: Love be with you, dear TEDster !
    I wish I have a life like what your lovely parents had ...

    As the below comment have said:
    "Ma doostetoon darim."

    With pure love from Iran,
    Amirpouya
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      Jan 5 2013: Thank you Amirpouya, very much!
      There is nothing as valuable as human relationships nor as durable as genuine love.
      I full-heartedly wish that for you!
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      Jan 17 2013: Dear Amirpouya,

      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you.
      ( To know about the prize see my comment to Ronny )
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Amirpouya,
      I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration.
      Be well :)
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        Jan 21 2013: Dear Juliette,
        Every belief, every aim, and every hope I've followed in my life have ended to a lie and disappeared,
        But the only one I have never regret of, was love.
        You, just like Ronny, brought this amazing message to TED, so it's me who should be thankful of what you've done here, and ronny's talk.
        I've followed your post until today, and have enjoyed with every sign of love from you and other TEDsters here.

        Thanks for everything,
        Love be with you, one more time, and forever,
        Amirpouya
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          Jan 21 2013: Dear Amirpouya,

          Thank you. Sounds to me like you have lived the human life....and you managed to keep your eyes on the only thing that matters; Love. Love is the only truth, all else is illusion. And I can see that you know this in your heart.

          I appreciate you and the great positive energy that you so generously brought into this and other TED conversations. Actually I will change that to relentless positive energy for you. It means a lot. As Ronny says, " people fear and hate, build walls, to keep others out, but they have never met and know nothing about these people." That era is now ended. The new era has begun.

          I am glad to know that someone is following this thread. I added a few words from some of the most remarkable people and listed TED Talks that can hopefully be helpful in keeping the pathway 'lit."
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    Jan 4 2013: Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim

    lovely story.
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      Jan 5 2013: Thank you Jasmin. And thank you for a wonderful addition to our collective list.
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      Jan 17 2013: Dear Jasmin,

      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you.
      ( To know about the prize see my comment to Ronny )
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Jasmin,
      I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration. Be well :)
  • Dec 30 2012: Hi Juliette, hi everybody,

    thank you really much sharing your story.
    And for this, some additional info, for hungarian language :)

    I. General infos:
    1.
    S+z = Sz in hungarian and you pronounce it like "s" from word "super"
    ő = you pronounce it like "ea" from "Earl grey tee"
    é = you pronounce it like "a" from "say"
    á = you pronounce it like

    ((see some more here: http://wikitravel.org/en/Hungarian_phrasebook))

    2. "You" - that has many translations in hungarian, it is very similiar to german in this viewpoint... ;)
    I = Én
    You = Te
    He / She / It = Ő
    We = Mi
    You = Ti
    They = Ők

    See... It is fun, 'cause the word "You" can have even more meenings in hungarian.
    You = friendly form if I say something to you Juliette, if you are just alone. "Hi Juliette, could you go to the shop?"
    You = polite for if you say somethinig to You Juliette, if you are just alone. "Please Mrs Juliette could You go to the shop?"
    You = if I say something to you, Juliette, and some more people with you. "Please could you go together to the shop?"

    II. "We love You":

    1. Szeretünk: It can be understood for every form of "You" told in I./2.
    2. Szeretünk Téged : In this longer form "Téged" is in german "Dich". That's what Lejan has written also about german. It is the accusative form of german "Du"=english "You".
    This "Téged" is the accusative of "Te", sooo, Singular person, friendly form --> see I. / 2 / second line... .;)))

    3. Szeretünk Titeket:
    In this longer form "Titeket" is in german "Euch". That's what Lejan has written also about german. It is the accusative form of german "Ihr"=english "You".
    This "Titeket" is the accusative of "Ti", sooo, Singular person, friendly form --> see I. / 2 / fifth line... .;)))

    III. "I love you"

    1. Szeretlek
    2. Szeretlek Téged : For "Téged" see above in II / 2, and I/2/second line
    3. Szeretlek Titeket: For "Titeket" see above in II / 3, and I/2/fifth line

    That's it. ;)
    Easy thing, just you have to get used to it :)
    I wish you all a happy new year,
    Tamas
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      Dec 30 2012: Hi Tamas,

      Thank You !! Your comment could not have come at a better time. A serious deprivation is cured since we woke up to a beautiful thick blanket of white snow....after not having had any last winter...... Also since we have been procuring the ingredients for my favorite http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:2009-09-gulasch-pörkölt-paprikas-3.jpg - I will come back to study my present (selfishly I take it all for myself ;-) from you and learn a bit of the hungarian language soon.

      In one of my past comments I mentioned that when I looked back on my long education I realized that the top professor for me was a Hungarian. He didn't teach languages but one of the things I learned was the " sz" sounding like "s" because his name was Dr. Szabo. I sometimes wonder if I like gulyás because of him. (We didn't eat it with him)

      For now I take with me " Szeretünk ".
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      Jan 17 2013: Dear Tamas,

      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you.
      (To know about the prize see my comment to Ronny)
  • Dec 27 2012: we love you, in hebrew
    אנחנו אוהבים אתכם
    pronounced: anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)

    ronny edry (fb: israel-loves-iran)
    from israel
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      Dec 27 2012: Thank you Ronny for freeing the hearts of all people - and showing us the way to building together - because that is the only way to having the life we all come here to have.

      And thank you for honoring us with your presence and contribution here.
      • Dec 28 2012: :)
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          Jan 17 2013: Dear Ronny,

          In honor of my parents, in light of all the good inspirational teachings and provisions with which they sent me forth in this life, and in honor of you, who brought the idea of peace on Earth to a tangible manifestation on an anniversary of their prayers; my birth, I have come up with a thought. I create the Zahn Peace Prize on this day 1/17/13. It is just a heart-felt recognition for the work you have done, for the holding and promotion of peace.

          In order to effectively put our good ideas to work, there has to be the means. But the will is the most important. That is what you have. And that is what you have inspired us to find in our hearts through your courage.

          As of now our work is cut out for us. I am still counting on my lucky stars to shine on and be able to put any physical means to my prize. So for now I hope you accept my dedication of this page to you. And I hand you the core directive passed onto me; ‘ just be a force of love in this world ’.
  • Jan 21 2013: Yeah, certainly I have already copied the result, the list of "we love you" from one of your comments;)
    But now it came tom mymind..maybe I will copy all of the comments - you know, as I have seen/read, not just the endresult is lovely (call it "what"..) but the way people have contributed to this simple but lovely idea (call it "how?")

    I really appreciate the whole story all of the contributors.
    The "what" and the "how" :)

    Ciao, tamas
  • Jan 21 2013: HI juliette. you know who I am : )
    私たちはあなたを愛しています。
    I wish all people from Israel or Iran get happiness.
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      Jan 21 2013: Hi Etsuko;

      Welcome and so wonderful to see you !!

      Thank your for your entry.

      Would you confirm that this is good or please make corrections

      私たちはあなたを愛しています

      ' Watashi Tatshi Wa Anata O Ai Shite Mas'

      WE........LOVE........YOU
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Etsuko;

      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this small pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you .
      (To know about the prize, see my comment to Ronny )
      (To see CREDITS - scroll through)
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    Jan 21 2013: Hug O'War

    I will not play at tug o' war.
    I'd rather play at hug o' war,
    Where everyone hugs
    Instead of tugs,
    Where everyone giggles
    And rolls on the rug,
    Where everyone kisses,
    And everyone grins,
    And everyone cuddles,
    And everyone wins.

    ~ Shel Silverstein
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    Jan 21 2013: There is a lot to learn from a world class language learner like Tim Ferriss.

    He suffered through his language classes in school, and came to the conclusion that he was terrible at languages and will never learn. Later that set him on a “panic driven search for the perfect language method.

    “.... Nothing worked until I found this. This is the Joyo Kanji. This is a Tablet rather, or a poster of the 1,945 common-use characters as determined by the Ministry of Education in 1981. Many of the publications in Japan limit themselves to these characters, to facilitate literacy -- some are required to. And this became my Holy Grail.”

    He mastered Japanese (speaking writing and reading) in six months. And he went on to learn 11 other languages.
    It's oftentimes what you do, not how you do it, that is the determining factor.

    His attitude is “smash fear, learn anything.”

    He also overcame his other fears. He became terrified of swimming because he was bullied and hurt as a child at the pool. He overcame his fear completely, and went on to become a master swimmer after two weeks of studying and learning swimming at age 31.

    His suggestion: especially with fears you gained when you were a child. take the analytical frameworks, the capabilities you have, apply them to old fears. Apply them to very big dreams.

    He does all this by focussing on commonalities.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/tim_ferriss_smash_fear_learn_anything.html
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    Jan 21 2013: Interesting information on human languages and migration:

    According to the Out of Africa hypothesis, around 50,000 years ago a group of humans left Africa and proceeded to inhabit the rest of the world, including Australia and the Americas, which had never been populated by archaic hominids. Some scientists believe that Homo sapiens did not leave Africa before that, because they had not yet attained modern cognition and language, and consequently lacked the skills or the numbers required to migrate.

    Homo erectus managed to leave the continent much earlier (without extensive use of language, sophisticated tools, nor anatomical modernity) while anatomically modern humans remained in Africa for such a long period.

    (from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_language)
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    Jan 21 2013: Interesting information on the human language center:
    The human language center is a modification of neural circuits common to all primates. This modification and its skill for linguistic communication seem to be unique to humans, which implies that the language organ derived after the human lineage split from the primate (chimps and bonobos) lineage.

    (from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_language)
  • Jan 20 2013: thanks Juliette. it will be an honor...
    i m sorry i just read your letter now.. so busy + the kids are sick :)
    see u
    ronny
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Ronny,

      Busy is good :) especially at your job :)

      Please take good care of all your children (your students and family's) :) They may save us all !!

      Children are our only connection to the source of spontaneous compassion....They trust in us, and we owe them a better world.
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      Jan 21 2013: p.s. please also give my love to Mikha'el :-) and ......all the people who worked/work with you on your project!!
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      Jan 21 2013: p.s. please also give my love to Mikha'el :-) and ......all the people who worked/work with you on your project!!
  • Jan 18 2013: I feel that I am the one who should add the Turkish form of it.

    Simple !

    "Sizi Seviyoruz"

    ("Siz" as "You" but in formal form, "Seviyoruz" as a progressive verb form which means "to love", "-i" as an accusative case, indicates object of the verb)
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      Jan 19 2013: Dear Atalay,

      Welcome and I am glad you came to TED for joining our effort, and from a city that CONNECTS two continents!!
      I will add your contribution to the list for everyone to learn to say 'we love you' in Turkish as:

      "Sizi Seviyoruz"
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Atalay,

      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this small pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you .
      (To know about the prize, see my comment to Ronny )
      • Jan 21 2013: Thank you for the Zahn Peace Prize !

        I'm glad to have it and I have already accepted, this is such a great idea.

        I'll keep supporting you...
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          Jan 21 2013: :-)
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          Jan 21 2013: Dear Atalay,

          I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration. Be well :)
  • Jan 17 2013: Hi Juliette,
    Thank you, was an honour to give a hand in such a topic - especially after this really tough day of mine;)

    A did a quick search for your comment to Ronny - i am really sorry, for this silly question, but where is it..?
    Anyway, thank you for your kindness,
    Wish U Happiness,
    Ciao, tamas
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      Jan 17 2013: Thank you Tamas:)
      See it in this thread after his comment entry on date Dec 28, 2012.
      • Jan 20 2013: ohooo :)
        yepp, I found it - till now just because of some mobile device I couldn't.

        Thank you Juliette for the topic, and thanks to everybody for the really lovely contribution.

        ciao,tamas
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          Jan 21 2013: Dear Tamas

          I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration. Be well :)
  • Jan 12 2013: Juliette,

    The last thread got too long (I cannot reply anymore) so I'll just make a new topic here.

    Well Chinese is probably the same as English in a sense. Just as there are many English words the average person will not use, there are also many Chinese characters that people do not use. Even native speakers do not know all the words; they just learn the common ones that will be used in everyday conversation/writing. That said, it is not uncommon for native Chinese to occasionally forget how to write a particular character (especially the obscure ones) because each character is learned individually and there is no alphabet (as in English) of which to relate to.

    The phonetics we have been using, for instance, would be unheard of to a native speaker because they simply learn how to say the words individually. I know what the phonetics are because I had to learn Mandarin in school, but if you ask me what the phonetics are for Cantonese (a separate dialect of Chinese of which I am a native speaker) I would not be able to tell you because I simply learned from birth what the words sound like. The written language however is all the same regardless of dialect.

    So in regards to your question of how long it takes to learn all the characters, many do not. In fact, bilingual Chinese will often substitute English words in place of their Chinese counterparts merely because it easier to say and less complicated. So it is not uncommon to see Chinese conversations interspersed with the occasional English word to replace a difficult Chinese term.
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      Jan 13 2013: Dear Matthew,

      What a relief to hear that not every character is to be memorized. They seems very complicated and hard to learn. It is like having to carry a gallery of images in ones head :-)

      I am learning that: Chinese is the most used language in the world. The development of Chinese characters can be dated back to about 4,500 years.

      Thank you so much for your patience in explaining a hard concept !! I think it certainly is one of the most beautiful languages:). Beyond the beauty of the written letters and words, I think that pictorial languages might have to come back because of their universal representation.
      • Jan 18 2013: (Replying to your topic about a prize) Why thank you, I certainly did not expect an award :) personally I do not think I did anything extraordinary - there are plenty of other Chinese people who could have explained what I told you - but it is all about taking that first step to say something. And to me that is what is beautiful about Ronny's concept: it is such a small and simple action, yet it has such a great impact and means so much to people who have been told all their lives to hate a certain group of people.

        When I saw your topic it somehow struck a chord with me and I just had to reply to it (hence I made this account). Why? In part it is because there were no Chinese representatives here, but it is also because you represent a different kind of world view that is, honestly, shocking to me. Currently I study Criminology, which revolves around a simple question: why do people commit crime? What drives generally good people to commit atrocities? And how do we stop it?

        No one really knows the answers to these questions. But the trend for stopping crime seems to be more enforcement and more punishment - ie. more police, harsher sentences. There is a reason why few people would willingly open their doors to strangers the way you do. In my view, we have unfortunately become a society where people are increasingly isolated from one another. We lock our doors, tell children not to talk to strangers - in short, we have learned to fear the people we do not know.
      • Jan 18 2013: (Continuing) But it does not have to be that way. You opened your doors to people and (as far as I know) no one tried to take advantage of it. People were appreciative. It makes me think that maybe the way to stop crime is not to punish people, or shut them out of society; rather it is to let them in, form connections with them the way you did. Of course this sounds simple on paper, but it is an enormously difficult concept for people to grasp - especially people who are used to punitive systems, to hating those who are different and building both literal and figurative walls around them.

        I myself had a hard time grasping it when I came across Restorative Justice for the first time (which focuses on rehabilitation for criminals, not punishment). The idea of not punishing a criminal was utterly shocking to me. But it also made me think about why we naturally gravitate towards a punitive system - is it really to deter criminals, or it is just to make the average law-abiding citizen feel better about themselves?

        That's my take on the matter. It is my belief you and Ronny have demonstrated what can happen when people will simply take the first step to reach out to others. Israeli and Palestinians do not have to hate each other; we do not have to be wary of every stranger we meet. I would also like to ask whether you would allow me to include your story in my papers for Restorative Justice; surely many others would want to know about this as well.

        -Matthew
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          Jan 19 2013: Dear Matthew,

          It is most touching to know that you joined TED to participate in this effort. It is especially meaningful to know the depth where yours comes from.

          I hope you will read the rest of the comments also in this thread. Every new year's eve, I silently prayed for world peace. But this year I chose to do it out loud. There is enough goodness in this world for all to share. I am inspired by all peace workers. My motto is ' shed light not blood'. The reason I put my story out here at the dawn of 2013 was to share this idea, so I am hoping that you can use it to shed light on everyone's life you touch.

          As you move on on the road to peace, I send you the following, as parting gift :) and I hope you will hear;

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mM11v_16-o
          http://www.ted.com/talks/israel_and_iran_a_love_story.html
          http://www.ted.com/playlists/22/the_road_to_peace.html
          http://www.ted.com/talks/chris_anderson_how_web_video_powers_global_innovation.html

          and use all these in your life and work.
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          Jan 21 2013: Dear Matthew,
          I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration. Be well :)
  • Jan 12 2013: I suppose you missed one language here lol
    Korean: 사랑합니다.

    But in that case, this word would be more appropriate, I guess--> 환영합니다.

    What a beautiful childhood you have...!

    I wish I could do the same thing to strangers who wander on the street, but I have to say, at least for me, it's almost not really possible.

    Needless to say, so many crimes and dreadful stories leave me no choice but to keep my eyes open to keep my house safe from strangers...


    But by no means, this kind of protectiveness should be the main obstacle that prevents us from welcoming people with all our hearts.

    I was told that my grandparents had used to welcome strangers and provide them with food and shelter just like your parents.

    Actually, in their time, people were quite naïve and very kind compared to us, who live in this more modernized world.

    This trace of people’s warm-hearted behavior is now some kind of nostalgia to us.
    Although the way people used to treat other people would be different now, the spirit of it is still alive as you plainly show us ‘the list’.

    Juliette, 사랑합니다 :)
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      Jan 12 2013: Dear Elizabeth;

      Thank you so much!! It is nice to see you here!! I think I am missing many languages still :-)I read somewhere that there are more than 4500 languages in the world...I am guessing that more than half are dialects of the same languages.

      I agree with what you said about the relative naïveté and kindness of the past generations. And I agree that it would be great to bring back that kind of trust to our world again. Thieves existed since the beginning of time and they are still the lowest form of humans. They are very few. Maybe in today's world, hosting, like for exchange students, would help improve our understanding.

      I love the Korean alphabet. The writing looks like pictures!! Would you be able to write the Korean for us in English letters so we could read it and try to learn that way?
      • Jan 12 2013: Sure :)

        사랑합니다 --> Sa Lang Hab Ni Da
        환영합니다 --> Hoan Yeong Hab Ni Da
        Korean alphabets were created to make people understand the way they pronounce letters.
        It might sound weird to foreigners lol, but once you understand the principle, you'd realize
        they are quite easy to pronounce.

        But however different it may be, each different language has its unique meaning,
        and when you notice they have many things in common, such as "we love you", you'd feel this
        fundamental connection that human beings are able to sense.

        It's incredible that we have "languages" to express our delicate thoughts and feelings.
        We should be grateful, right?
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          Jan 13 2013: Dear Elizabeth,

          Thankfully, today we have so many tools that can be used to build understanding, so I hope we must use every one.
          I have posted your entry is on list 27. Please let me know if I need to make any adjustments.
          Thank you!! 감사합니다:)
          After pasting this from Google, I just noticed that the last three characters (합니다) look similar to the two words you gave me!!
      • Jan 13 2013: Yes, '합니다' is the honorific in Korea.
        Btw, you said, "Hoan Yeong Sa Lang Hab Ni Da"

        Actually, it's "Hoan Yeong Hago Sa Lang Hab Ni Da"

        "환영(합니다)Hoan Yeong " means, "(I or We) welcome (you)."
        And "사랑(합니다)Sa Lang" means, "(I or We) love (you)." –Subject and object are omitted.
        Both of them are verbs, so they cannot be put together.

        For instance, we can't say, "I welcome love you." in English, right?
        'Cause when we want to use two verbs together at the same time, we need to use conjunctions like "and".

        That's why I added "하고Hago" above.

        Thank you for your list. It makes me smile :)
        Hoan Yeong Hago Sa Lang Hab Ni Da, Juliette :D
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          Jan 13 2013: :) Thank you.
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          Jan 17 2013: Dear Elizabeth,

          I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

          Thank you.
          ( To know about the prize see my comment to Ronny )
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    Jan 12 2013: Arabic : Nouhiboukoum نحبكم
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      Jan 12 2013: Hello, and welcome!!

      Would you write that out and tell us which part is we , which is love, Which is you ( plural )?
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        Jan 12 2013: Hi Juliette,
        The verb "love" in arabic is " Ouhibou ", the " N " stands for "nahnou" which means "we" or "us" so it's for plural, "koum" is to say "you" in plural.
        "I love you"
        for masculine singular is : "ouhibouka"
        for feminine singular is : "ouhibouki"
        for masculine plural : "ouhiboukoum"
        for feminine plural : "ouhiboukounna"

        To say "we love you", we add "N" at the beginning of each of the words above.
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          Jan 12 2013: Hi Abdelbari,
          That is very helpful. I am able to see the word ending changes according to the person we are speaking to. It is starting to make sense. I am thankful. I also want you to know, on a side note, that I love your avatar.......now you can never change it - because of me ;-)

          Thank you!!
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        Jan 14 2013: Hi Juliette,
        I hope it's not copyrighted, because I won't change it, because of you :D
        I think read something about " you and your husband ..... " I read it but had nor time to reply, if you're still interested :
        Actually, in arabic, we can talk to Two people without using plural, the plural starts from 3 people and more. So if you want to say I love you to your two children (no matter the gender), you say " Ouhiboukouma ", if you and you husband want to say it at the same time :we love you, you say " Nouhiboukouma".
        I hope this helps. And you are so welcome :)
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        Jan 14 2013: I don't know why you have put " Nouhiboukouma " on the list ! you say that when you're talking to two people, only two ! I don't know if you got it right :)

        LOL, this was funny, thanks :D And yes, it's true, I think that we are obsessed about cheeks lol
        Actually I'm from Algeria which has different traditions from the Middle Eastern countries as we're not arabs, or we weren't ......... History ! but we do share the " Cheeks Obsession ". Mostly, we kiss two times or four on the cheek while greeting someone we haven't seen for a while and this depends on the person, some people you need to cheek kiss them once you don't meet for few days or a week, some you never kiss them, you just hand shake, but we have some occasion where everybody kisses everyone, like in the two "Eids", they're like your christmass maybe, any way; we don't really kiss on the cheek, we just put the cheek on the cheek, when it comes to women we kiss generally ( but not all women ! women from family and they're specific, like mother, aunt, sister and so ... ). Personally I have a friend who cheek kisses me and tight-hug me every day he sees me, sometimes he forgets he saw me earlier that day, so I receive another Kisses and Hugs XD
        Do you like our traditions Juliette ? :p
        Sorry, I talk a lot, and this is not a tradition lol.
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          Jan 14 2013: Hi Abdelbari,

          I do like your traditions. AND I am happy you break tradition and talk a lot......how else would we ever learn about each other!!

          I am sorry if I misunderstood. You wrote " if you and you husband want to say it (to son and daughter) at the same time : we love you, you say 'Nouhiboukouma' ...."

          Please tell me the right one to put on the list:)
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        Jan 16 2013: Hi Jul,
        I think the right thing to say depends on who you are talking to, in your idea you said you want to say "we love you" to people who come to your home and i suggest they're a lot so you say " Nouhiboukoum ". I guess this the right thing, I thought you really have a son and a daughter :)

        When I see Maz I will tell him about the copyrights and ask him if he wants to use them, with MONEY of course :p Quick Money for us :D

        PS : I liked you first reply better, you edit a lot XD
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          Jan 17 2013: Hi Abdelbari,

          YOU are our QM-agent.......as of now:-)
          I liked my first reply better too ......I'll see if I can find it and put it back.....glad you received it.....i edit my comment when I feel I have made myself misunderstood..........and when no one seems to find it 'helpful' or 'worthwhile' , I delete it to keep the TED roads 'unlittered' :-)

          Also Do you speak French? Not that I have gotten very far with my phrase in Arabic....but if yes please enter the phrase in French also...........while I disentangle my left brain from it's language confusion :)
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        Jan 17 2013: Do i speak french ? I only studied it for 9 years in school, after that I studied everything in the university in French for 4 years, and this is sad :( how our governmental responsibles replaced our beautiful language with another one to use in Universities !

        Anyway, get back to work;
        In french you can say " We love you " using two forms
        1. Nous vous aimons. ( nous = we / vous = you (plural) / aimons = the verb " aimer" (to love) in present simple ).

        2. On vous aime. ( on = Pronoun of the third person " il " (he).

        The first form is more precise because " Nous " means exactly " we " and represents exactly the persons who are talking, in your case you and your family.
        The second form is kind of more general, the pronoun " On " is used to indicate one or lot of indefinite persons, it's used in the place of "Nous " and in other places.

        I think you can put " Nous vous aimons " on your list.

        Hope you disentangle yourself from your language confusion quickly :)
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          Jan 17 2013: Dear Abdelbari,

          I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

          Thank you.
          ( To know about the prize see my comment to Ronny )
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        Jan 18 2013: Aw :) Haven't received a prize a long time ago ^^ and I accept it of course Juliette.

        PS: I can't find any comments from Ronny, the date you specified up in your reply to someone else doesn't even exist, but never mind, the nomination is the most important thing to me ;)

        Thank you, much APPRECIATED.
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          Jan 18 2013: See
          Ronny Edry
          TED SPEAKER
          Dec 27 2012: we love you, in hebrew
          אנחנו אוהבים אתכם
          pronounced: anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)

          ronny edry (fb: israel-loves-iran)
          from israel

          You can find Ronny's comments in this conversation stream. When you scroll through check for the dates of postings. They are not chronological.
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        Jan 19 2013: a heart-felt recognition ? That's just nice because you seem to an honest person and I can feel that you mean it and this brings more meaning to the prize :)

        Do you think that this world will know peace one day ? I am not being pessimist, but with all this greed in the world it just seems to be a very hard cause and a long journey, but we have to try anyway.

        Some people would not start an idea like this, thinking that this is not going to change anything and this reminded me a story that I want to share with you :

        " One day, says the legend, there was a huge forest fire. From all the terrified animals, only the little Hummingbird makes an action, and splits on the fire. Annoyed, the Armadillo says to him :
        " Hummingbird ! this is useless ! "
        "I know, but I do my part ".


        You keep on the good work Jul ;) and Thanks again.
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          Jan 19 2013: Dear Abdelbari,

          Thank you for this great reminder.

          To answer your question:
          "Do you think that this world will know peace one day?" YES:)

          All peace in the world comes from the inner peace of human minds. Each person is in charge of their own mind. We each are responsible for our inner peace. Once we realize that, and each make peace within our selves, then peace will be seen outside of us in the world. Peace is what we are here for, what we became 'human' for.....otherwise there are enough animals, our species wouldn’t be an improvement.

          Peace happens when we confirm inside our own mind, our trust in the greater intention of this universe for our well being. Knowing that we are loved, allows us to be good, to be fair, to be helpful, constructive, and not buy into hate. We resolve inside ourselves that we are here to honor that love, then the human life will work.

          Peace is a personal commitment to honor the greatest good.

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mM11v_16-o

          http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/2004/

          I think the time has come for all in the world to grasp this knowledge about themselves... Like Ronny has shown, it is easy... Chris turns his 'Big Wheel'..TED.

          SOON the business world will see that peace is much more profitable than war!!
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          Jan 21 2013: Dear Abdelbari,
          I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration. Be well :)
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          Jan 21 2013: Dear Abdelbari,

          Editing is important here because we are doing our best to produce a 'neat' and chatter-free general education piece with our collective effort.

          I can only edit or delete my own comments. You can edit and delete your comment ( entirely or parts). I wrote you directly for one reason. I never do that. This is an extremely rare thing for me to do with anyone except my students who pay a lot of tuition for my 'direct-to-your-face criticism'. I did this with you because you because I care, and because you are very special, to have made it this far. There is a lot of brilliance in you, then there is no need to carry doubt and interject doubt. We can be good and only good. This is not meant to cause arrogance in you. When you truly grasp your essence you will be humble. We can move forward that way. I actually liked this exchange, so I will leave this comment as is.

          Maybe I should start another session about couple's love advice ;-)
          Anyway I am pretty sure I wrote my solution for your dilemma on your question thread for you :-). Love is "bilaterally symmetrical " for it to move you forward it has to be mutually reciprocal. Be patient. Save your heart and soul for that person.
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        Jan 21 2013: Hi Juli,

        I wish I met you earlier :)

        " When you truly grasp your essence you will be humble ", This is exactly what I'm looking for and haven't found it yet, grasp my essence. To Be Honest, I don't know how or from where to start this, don't know if I'll find it and reach it than, I know I can seek help from others, read books or so, but there one thing that I'm sure of, I must do it by my own and find it by myself, some say this is the quest of our life !

        I don't think this a couple's love problem, this concerns me, and only me Juliette, Usually I never talk about this to anyone, even for my closest friends whom I really trust, a girl I love is classified under "Top Secret" for me, may sound stupid for some, but I don't care, this is the first girl I ever approached, I was 21 (last year). So I can tell and assure you that you are special and I felt comfortable talking to you, that's why I asked you.

        Thanks again Juliette, take care. good night :) ( it's 22:20 here )

        PS: Your students are very lucky to have you.
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          Jan 21 2013: Oop...now I see I should have suggested that you edit your previous comments and not delete it. When a comment is deleted it cuts the thread :-( but no worries the peace bridge is intact. I actually thought your last comment was one of your most valuable contributions, because it was pure and came from the heart. It was beautiful because you expressed that you had found yourself confronted with a "to your face critique"..which you had never experienced before.Yet you came around and responded from the heart.that kind of interaction was exactly what we need here.

          In the future, you can go back and modify and remove the parts of your writing using the edit button, but please do not delete your comment, I somehow thought my actions had shown this and assumed you would know. Lesson : No assumptions again. This is a worthwhile lesson to share; ~~ lets go back and edit, but never delete ~~ :-)
  • Jan 10 2013: Your new list does not include Chinese? That will not do, I will help :)

    Well it is actually very simple. "Wo Ai Ni" literally means "I Love You", in that Wo = Me, Ai = Love, Ni = You

    There is no direct word which means "we" in Chinese, so if you want to refer to a collective you would use "Wo Men", whereupon Wo = Me (as before) and "Men" serves to pluralize the "Wo". So "Wo Men" = pluralized "Me" = "We"

    In other words, to say "we love you" in Chinese would be "Wo Men Ai Ni". If you're curious the word "Men" is synonymous with the Chinese word for door (sounds the same but written slightly differently) which is fitting given you're opening the door to people who need it, so to speak.

    As a side note, if you want to be polite when referring to someone you can replace "ni" with "nin", which is a polite version of "you" that can be used when talking to strangers, or just to show respect (although not used very often nowadays). So "Wo Ai Nin" or "Wo Men Ai Nin" is also perfectly acceptable. When written out "Nin" is the same as "ni" except with a heart (Chinese word for heart) under it, again as a show of respect.

    Hope this makes sense. I firmly believe language connects people so I think it is really neat you're trying to learn the languages of other people. Plus I think this shows love is universal! It exists in all languages :)
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      Jan 11 2013: Hi Matthew, and Welcome, I am so glad you joined us!!

      Your nice explanation is very helpful in understanding a tiny portion of a complex language. I know that just knowing a phrase, or being able to say it doesn't give us the necessary cultural knowledge about it, but since love is truly universal, this is a great starting point.

      Chinese characters are so beautiful that I almost want to ask you to send them also. Not even sure they would make it across, software wise. But for the sake of our list, I think it'd be a thrill for everyone to be able to read the phrase, so we'll put in the English version for phonetics:

      (Wo Men) .......(Ai)..........(Nin)
      WE...................love..........You ( plural and polite)
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      Jan 11 2013: Dear Matthew, I received an email from TED with your posting but I can't see it on this page. If you don't see it either, please re-post it here. Thank you:)
      • Jan 11 2013: Yeah I did reply, thing is it only showed the first half of my post and cut out the rest...since it was late at night and I did not want to rewrite it, I deleted the whole thing and figured to post it again this morning.

        Anyway~ Chinese is a largely pictorial language, so yes the characters will make much more sense when it is seen. The phonetics actually have nothing to do with Chinese; those were added in later to make it easier for non-native speakers to learn the language, and native speakers (myself included) will often know how to say words without knowing what the phonetics for a word is. The official term for Chinese phonetics (using English characters) is actually 拼音or "pinyin", which means roughly "to match sounds".

        我們愛你 = "wo men ai ni"
        我們愛您 = "wo men ai nin"

        You'll notice that for the 你 and 您 ("ni" and "nin") they are both the same except that 您 has a 心at the bottom. 心is "xin" and means heart; when combined with 你 it makes the greeting more "heartfelt" and polite.

        Likewise the word for love in Chinese is 愛 ("ai") and also has a 心 in it (it is hard to see on here, but look at the middle of 愛). Literally in Chinese you cannot love without a heart.

        I used Google Translate to input these characters, so if they show up small on here you can also see a larger version on Google. Make sure to specify you want "traditional" Chinese characters ("simplified" Chinese reduces the number of strokes for some words to make it easier to learn) or the characters will look different from the ones I am using.
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          Jan 12 2013: Dear Matthew, Your explanation is so helpful that I am glad you returned with more energy:-)

          I did look at the characters in larger scale and am able to see the part of the characters that means 'heart'. If you hadn't walked me through, I would not in a million years see that. Which brings the question to my mind: how long does it take a native to learn all these characters?!!
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          Jan 17 2013: Dear Matthew,

          I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

          Thank you.
          ( To know about the prize see my comment to Ronny )
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    Jan 9 2013: You're absolutely correct about spiritual aspect of the Hawaiian language. However I believe that is also true of most indigenous languages. As a conservationist in Hawaii I cannot separate the Hawaiian culture from my conservation ethic. Before contact with Europeans, the Hawaiians had a very resilient and self-sufficient society. The population is estimated at about 1 million people. That's only slightly less than the current population of the state of Hawaii. Hawaiians were totally self-sufficient while in Hawaii today we import 95% of our food and all fuel. We have less than five days food supply on our islands and are totally dependent on our transportation system.

    My personal conservation philosophy is based on personal, community and global resilience. I have spent my life and my career caring for the land. Hawaiians call it Malama 'Āina. It is not enough to care for my small corner of the earth. It must start with personal resilience. Then if everyone takes care of their community, we can address the major issues facing our planet.

    It starts with personal resilience. Life long learning is vital to being able to respond to opportunities. Financial resilience makes it possible to bounce back from adversity. How many people do you know who can survive two months without a pay check?

    I help people set up aquaponics gardens. Our 4x6 foot garden supplies my family with a delicious salad every evening. I reach out to my community to help people be prepared for our next big storm. I help people create their own business that can provide them financial independence.

    The rugged individualist, so revered in American culture, is fine. I certainly believe in personal freedom and taking care of ones self. But, I also know the individual is limited by the time they can devote to a project. We can only reach our full potential by networking with others to accomplish our common goals.
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      Jan 11 2013: I put " Aloha kākou " on the list for Hawaiian.

      " Malama 'Āina" sounds like paradise work. Going to natural preservations is the best form of vacation, for my family. And in moderating my topic here, people have kindly brought so much understanding. I have gotten to see pictures of the mother planet and a diverse beauty I never knew existed. One of the other treasures of my childhood was a book of natural history that fascinated us with how nature had grown its balance, showing a single flower had started and evolved 50 million years ago! We appreciate those who have worked to conserve nature, all its plants and creatures. Every creature has its rightful place in the world. It is amazing how reduction in the number of "natures engineers" (beavers) for example, would end up affecting the irrigation system of a whole land, derailing the future of the planet and negatively affecting humanity. It is sad to read that " In Hawaii today we import 95% of our food and all fuel " and I think that disrupting the " total self-sufficiency" of a civilization was the way of the past century. In this century the turn around is visible. Different cultures are infused with growing understanding and respect.Thankfully.

      The idea of every home producing its own food, is a great one worthy of a TED talk. May be you could show it to the world from here someday.
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      Jan 9 2013: Hi Kate, Welcome!! It is ever more wonderful to see you here since we speak the same language!! Thank you for your touching words. My parents " hospitality project " can be done by anyone. The main part of the concept was that they thought of it as a give and take on a more valuable dimension than money could buy. I feel it develops creative thinking, which is why they had so much fun doing it..and it was more enriching for an environment to grow up in than anything else!
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      Jan 17 2013: Dear Kate,

      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you.
      (To know about the prize see my comment to Ronny)
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Kate,

      I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration. Be well :)
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    Jan 9 2013: Wau translates as I. La is there. Oe' is not in the dictionary. oe means a prolonged sound as in a whistle. 'oe means to resemble. "oē means to rustle or murmur as in the wind murmuring in the trees.

    bottom line. Aloha Wau La Oe' does not make sense to me, but Iʻm only going by the dictionary.

    Aloha does not have have any punctuation. No macrons or glottal stops although you often entertainers urge tourists to pronounce it Alōha with the o drawn out and exaggerated. It drives me nuts.

    Your folks sound like wonderful people and a lot of that rubbed off on you. Drop me an email note at bsager42@gmail.com. As you said, it was just luck you found my comment. Iʻm afraid you will get lost in Ted again. Bill
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      Jan 9 2013: Hi Bill,

      I am glad you looked up the original Hawaiian phrase. Obviously there are so much more expression than words could contain or carry. The Hawaiian language sounds profound as does the culture. There seems to be a closely woven spiritual aspect to the language itself.
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    Jan 9 2013: I think Māhele Hōkeo refers to the bond of love between two people. Iʻm not sure, but I donʻt think marriage became an Hawaiian concept until after the missionaries arrived.

    The Hawaiian language peels like an onion. At the surface it may have one meaning while deeper down the meaning may be totally different. Hawaiians seem to love a pun and take pride in saying one thing to a person who has a superficial knowledge of the language while a fluent person will understand the true intent of what is being said.

    Aloha kākou means may there be love between us and is the plural expression of Aloha kāua which is the singular expression of friendship or love. This is straight out of the Hawaiian dictionary so I know it is correct.


    Aloha kākou is the expression of friendship or love extended to a group.

    You are absolutely correct about understanding the culture. i think that may be more true of Hawaiian than any other language I know of. That is very true of hula. Many people understand the motion and may even be able to mouth the words, but Kumu Hula teach the cultural meaning of the words and the motions. To be a hula master you must understand the language and the culture.
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      Jan 17 2013: Dear William,
      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you.
      ( To know about the prize see my comment to Ronny )
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    Jan 9 2013: Hawaiian is a very complex language with many words and phrases having multiple meanings. There are often many ways to say something with slightly different meanings. For instance Aloha is often used to say hello and goodbye. How ever it is also an expression of love shared and at a deeper level it is the sharing of the breath of life, or the sharing of ones spirit. I like the expression Hōkeo which means to be in a bond of love. Māhele means to share, As in Māhele hōkeo. I notice you have a Hawaiian translation and I certainly would not argue with that.

    Iʻm not a Hawaiian speaker, but I have a good Hawaiian Dictionary
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      Jan 9 2013: Greetings Bill, Or I could say Aloha! ( since that is the one word I know ;-) So wonderful to see you here!

      I can never be sure but I thought that 'Aloha Wau La Oe' was a singular format, in other words a 1 to 1 saying. And we are looking for a 2 to 2 , or a 10 to 10 format that would be applicable from one group to another group.

      I feel that getting to really understand any language which is not our own birth tongue, requires a rather deep knowledge of the culture behind the language, hard to accumulate in one life time!! And of course Hawaiian, appears far from anything I am familiar with. But the complexity is intriguing. and makes learning a worthwhile adventure, for me anyway:-)

      Would ' Māhele Hōkeo ' apply to the plural?!
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Bill,

      I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration. Be well :)
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    Jan 6 2013: In FILIPINO (when referring to the national language, FILIPINO also pertains to the race/people) or Tagalog (one of the 171 local dialects. in a country composed of 7,100 islands) which happens to have been designated as the National Language of the Philippines: Filipino/Tagalog are therefore interchangeable.

    I LOVE YOU = Mahal kita (love you) a longer version is IKAW AY MAHAL KO [ Ikaw (you), ay (be or just a conjunction), mahal (love) ko (I)]

    WE LOVE YOU = Mahal namin kayo (Mahal is love, namin (we/us) is plural, and kayo (you) is plural but can also be singular when used to show a sign of respect to an older person usually.

    Its great that your parents brought that tradition of 'hospitality adventure' into your home!
    Warm regards,
    Mari
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      Jan 6 2013: Dear Mari;
      Thank you for your wonderful teaching. I sometimes wonder how many languages there would be in the world if we counted all dialects...Meanwhile...I am still trying to get my head around 7100 islands :-)

      Mahal.......namin.......kayo
      LOVE........WE.........YOU
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      Jan 17 2013: Dear Mari,
      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you.
      ( To know about the prize see my comment to Ronny )
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Mari,

      I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration.
      Be well :)
  • Jan 5 2013: Hi Juliette, the answers are:

    1 to 1 = (yo) te amo
    1 to 2 = (yo) los amo
    2 to 1 = (nosotros) te amamos
    2 to 2 = (nosotros) los amamos
    2 to 10 = (nosotros) los amamos

    Normally in spanish you do not mention yourself in singular or plural.
    It is more frecuent between friends or couple members to say "te quiero" or "los quiero".
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      Jan 6 2013: Spanish (español), also called Castilian, is a Romance language that originated in Castile, a region in Spain.

      Spanish is a part of the Ibero-Romance group that evolved from several dialects of spoken Latin in central-northern Iberia around the ninth century and gradually spread with the expansion of the Kingdom of Castile (present northern Spain) into central and southern Iberia during the later Middle Ages.

      The Iberian Romance languages or Ibero-Romance languages are the Romance languages that developed on the Iberian Peninsula, an area consisting primarily of Spain, Portugal, and Andorra.

      There are approximately 405 million people speaking Spanish as a native language, making it the second-most-spoken language by number of native speakers after Mandarin.

      Spanish is one of the six official languages of the United Nations ( the other five are English, French, Chinese,Russian, and Arabic)

      Spanish is used as an official language by the European Union and Mercosur (Common Market formed by Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Venezuela and Bolivia)

      Spanish : Los amamos will go on the list. I don't know why.. but somehow, to my new ear, " los quiero " sounds like it has a different tone to it ?!

      ~ Thank you!!
  • Jan 5 2013: Dear Juliette, your parents could say:
    Español: nosotros te amamos
    Or simply: te amamos
    Have a nice day.
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      Jan 5 2013: Hi César, Thank you. We have a question :

      Is there a difference in Spanish if we are speaking to one person or to 2 or more people?

      I love you =
      1 to 1

      I love you =
      1 to 2

      We love you =
      2 to 1

      We love you =
      2 to 2

      We love you =
      2 to 10
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      Jan 17 2013: Dear César,

      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you.
      ( To know about the prize see my comment to Ronny )
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    Jan 2 2013: Happy New Year everyone!!

    Here is my favorite way of starting a new day.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/louie_schwartzberg_nature_beauty_gratitude.html

    Have a good day today :-)
  • Dec 29 2012: Got another - this time from North America!

    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit

    Best regards,
    Nikolaj
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      Dec 30 2012: Greenland is the third largest country in North America !!

      In prehistoric times, Greenland was home to several successive Paleo-Eskimo cultures.

      And has the longest fjord in the world.

      A fjord is a long, narrow inlet with steep sides or cliffs, created in a valley carved by glacial activity. The word in many cases refers to any long narrow body of water. A fjord is formed when a glacier cuts a U-shaped valley. A fjord has extreme currents and large saltwater rapids (see skookumchuck). Saltstraumen in Norway is often described as the world's strongest tidal current. These characteristics distinguish fjords from rias (e.g. the Bay of Kotor), which are drowned valleys flooded by the rising sea.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Greenland2.1ac.jpg
      I do have a hard time believing is http://www.flickr.com/photos/kiddi/4040357702/
      I may have to see it :-))

      Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
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      Jan 9 2013: Hi Nikolaj,

      In my childhood knowledge there were people known as "Eskimo". It was extremely fascinating for us as children to know there were people who lived in houses made of ice or a ground made of ice.

      So far I have learned the following:

      "The earliest known Eskimo cultures (pre-Dorset) date to 5,000 years ago.

      They appear to have evolved in Alaska from people using the Arctic small tool tradition who probably had migrated to Alaska from Siberia at least 2,000 to 3,000 years earlier, though they might have been in Alaska as far back as 10,000 to 12,000 years or more. There are similar artifacts found in Siberia going back perhaps 18,000 years.

      Today, the two main groups of Eskimos are the Inuit of northern Alaska, Canada and Greenland, and the Yupik of Central Alaska.

      The Yupik comprises speakers of four distinct Yupik languages originated from the western Alaska, in South Central Alaska along the Gulf of Alaska coast, and the Russian Far East.

      The term Eskimo is commonly used by those in the lower 48 (states of the USA) and in Alaska to include both Yupik and Inupiat. No universal term other than Eskimo, inclusive of all Inuit and Yupik people, exists for the Inuit and Yupik peoples.

      And most importantly perhaps that the word "Eskimo" is no longer used!!

      "In Canada and Greenland, the term Eskimo has fallen out of favour, as it is sometimes considered pejorative and has been replaced by the term Inuit. The Canadian Constitution Act of 1982, sections 25 and 35 recognized the Inuit as a distinctive group of aboriginal peoples in Canada." (This is from Wikipedia)

      I am trying to learn a little about the Greenlandic people....because however they are named, I still find them fascinating. Many questions but: How do they cope with having a constant a 24-hour sunlight??
      How do they cope with having a constant a 24-hour darkness??
  • Dec 29 2012: I'm running out of online immigrants to stalk, but here is one more:

    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum

    Clicky clicky: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faroese_language

    :)

    The Faroe Islands are a part of Denmark with their own "home rule". And language, obviously. It is kind of close to Icelandic.

    Best regards,
    Nikolaj
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      Dec 30 2012: It is amazing to learn that Faroese is of Indo-European Origin.

      The Faroese alphabet consists of 29 letters derived from the Latin alphabet. It belongs to the following language family:

      Indo-European Languages > Germanic Languages > North Germanic Languages > West Scandinavian Languages > Faroese

      Faroese and Icelandic, its closest extant relative, are not mutually intelligible in speech, but the written languages resemble each other quite closely.

      Listening to it, I sense a slight Irish flavor also!!

      After taking a virtual trip to Faroe Islands I learned a lot......

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Faroe_islands_map_with_island_names.png
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTj26z1KYV8

      Despite the dim light I was inspired for my next painting ( this happens after actual trips - usually)!!
      and I dreamt of puffins on gassy hills last night:-)

      Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Nikolaj,

      I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration.
      Be well :)
  • Dec 27 2012: A few from the Balkans:

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo (jup, same as the Bosnian)
    Serbian: Ми вас волимо (actually it is the exact same as the Bosnian and Croatian versions - they just use the Cyrillic alphabet instead)
    Macedonian: Ве сакаме ("Ve sakame" if written in the Latin alphabet, however the Cyrillic alphabet is the one officially used in Macedonia). Google translate says it is "vi elsker dig" (singular) and not "vi elsker jer" (plural). However my Bosnian translator-friend says it is correct.

    A few from Eastern Europe:
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: Мы вас любим (Latin: My vas lyubim)
    Bulgarian: Обичаме ви (Latin: Obichame vi)

    And two more from here in Scandinavia (Swedish, Danish and Norwegian are familiar languages):
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker dere

    I'll see if I can fetch some more.

    Best regards,
    Nikolaj
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      Dec 27 2012: How enriching !!

      First we are learning the word Balkan :

      The word "Balkan" means mountain ( in Turkish) and has been applied to the area since the early 19th century. The chain of mountains called "Balkan"; Normally considered as naturel frontiers of the Balkans are the rivers Donau and Sava in the North, the Black Sea in the East, the Aegean Sea in the South and the Adriatic Sea in the West.

      Balkan Countries are located in South-East Europe:

      Slovenia
      Croatia
      Bosnia-Hercegovina
      Montenegro
      Serbia
      Romenia
      Bulgaria
      Macedonia
      Albania
      Greece
      Part of Turkey
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      Dec 27 2012: Cyrillic is one of the most used writing systems in the world.

      Ми вас волимо

      The Cyrillic script or azbuka is an alphabetic writing system. It is based on the Early Cyrillic, which was developed in the First Bulgarian Empire during the 10th century AD at the Preslav Literary School. It is the basis of alphabets used in various languages, past and present, in parts of the Balkans and Northern Eurasia, especially those of Slavic origin, and non-Slavic languages influenced by Russian. As of 2011 around 252 million people in Europe and Asia use it as the official alphabet for their national languages. About half of them are in Russia.

      ( from .wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_script )
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      Dec 27 2012: We learn about Macedonia and Macedonian:

      Macedonia - The republic of Makedonia is a country located in the central Balkan peninsula in Southeast Europe. It is one of the successor states of the former Yugoslavia, from which it declared independence in 1991.

      Makedonia has five immediate neighbors :

      Serbia (North)
      Kosovo ( Northwest)
      Bulgaria (East)
      Albania (west)
      Greece (South)


      I must say that I wish they had used "K" not 'C" for us in school - then we would have already learned to pronounce Makedonia correctly.

      Now we know :-) and

      We love Makedonija !!
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      Dec 27 2012: Nikolaj du gør dette en fantastisk oplevelse med dine super bidrag. Vi har fået det bedre selv, mens vi lider alvorlig sne afsavn her :-) :-) Hvis jeg glemmer at sige det senere, tak så meget! Vi har seksten sætninger nu !!
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    Dec 27 2012: Norwegian: I love you = Jeg elsker deg, We love you = Vi elsker deg

    Love Helge :-)
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      Dec 27 2012: Dear Helge; How wonderful of you to show up and just in the nick of time!!

      I just put your phrase in the nice "pronunciation machine" ;-) (which Xavier gave us for Christmas) and I was surprised to learn the correct way of saying it..... It sounds wonderful !!

      Vi elsker deg

      Takk så mye ♥
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      Jan 17 2013: Dear Helge;

      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this small pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you.
      (To know about the prize, see my comment to Ronny )
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Helge,

      I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration. Be well :)
  • Dec 25 2012: Hi Juliette - got think of (from the part were you are talking with Lejan, all of which I have read with interest) if you want the "you" part to be singular or plurar? As in "we love you (individual person)" or as in "we love you (your kind/everyone)"?

    If in plural the Danish is "Vi elsker jer". Also, the German should probably be changed as well*

    (I noted the mention between "du" and "Sie". We actually have the same distinction in Danish between casual and official titling (du/Sie in German, du/Dem in Danish). However if you use the official titling in Danish you either have to be a very pretentious hotshot in the business world or just using it for some very old old people lying on their death bed who probably thinks it is hilarious for someone younger to use those old entitlements (I know my grandmother on my fathers side got sick of it when she was 92 and waiting to die). However as we have German in grade school we learn it might have some implications when interacting with Germans. My own experience though is that if you just are friendly, inviting and generally respectful Germans will let all atrocities toward their language by a drunken Dane pass).
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      Dec 25 2012: Hi Nikolaj - Thank you for this window into the Danish culture. It really helps to know a little about the language and culture of a people before we interact with one another.

      Your writing put a smile on my face especially the point made by your 92-yr old grandma :-) :-) that

      ~~ The key is being friendly, inviting and generally respectful ~~
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      Dec 26 2012: tak:-):-)
  • Dec 24 2012: Danish: Vi elsker dig

    I will try to find some more for you when I get back home tomorrow. I've got some immigrant contacts here.

    Cheers,
    Nikolaj
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      Dec 24 2012: Ok Nikolaj. Thank you, we'll wait with joy.
      Happy Holidays now.
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      Jan 17 2013: Dear Nikolaj;

      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this small pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you.
      (To known about the prize, see my comment to Ronny)
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    Lejan .

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    Dec 22 2012: German: Wir lieben Dich

    for 'We love you'

    And thank you for sharing this beautiful story and, even more, example!
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      Dec 22 2012: Thank you Lejan. Good to see you!!
      Enjoying the tool I newly acquired from Xavier..I just noticed that in German, there are many ways of saying "you". I am thinking this may be a good time for me to stop my confusion and learn the correct plural form to use.
      Would we say "Wir lieben sie" or Sie, du, man, ihr, dich, dir, euch, ihnen ?!
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        Lejan .

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        Dec 22 2012: Good to see you too, Juliette!

        To say 'We love you' in German is actually not that complex... :o)

        We distinguish just two forms to talk to one another, a private and a polite, more formal form.

        Close people we call 'Du' and people we don't know well enough we call 'Sie'. That's all ... :o)

        The declination of those personal pronouns for nominative / genitive / dative / accusative gives a bit of variety:

        Du / Deiner / Dir / Dich (private form, singular)

        Sie / Ihrer / Ihnen / Sie (official form, singular & plural)

        So if you wish to be a bit more official with your guests, you say:

        Wir lieben Sie

        I could now write for hours to explain why Germans are way more 'selective' in using the word 'Love' or 'Liebe' than Americans do, yet as you are American, you are 'allowed' to use it as often as you please and most of your German guests would know how to 'take' it ... :o)
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          Dec 22 2012: Wow!! You bring up important points: Culture, Context and Choice.

          Yes I love the freedom to say I love you. I make sure to exercise this freedom every day :-)

          It costs nothing to say it, not even pennies; it is literally free.

          And we too have a lot of room for growth - in meaningful ways.

          And culture - I wish that you would take that time and "explain why Germans are way more 'selective' in using the word 'Love' or 'Liebe' than Americans do." Reading your writings on the topic will be a nice Christmas present to get :-)

          It sounds like the German language has a built-in feel to it....so far I have sectioned the phrases into two parts. First I have learned the "Wir Lieben" - that part stays the same. For the second segment ..... I will give myself a few days to assimilate what you have given in the above "lesson" :-)
          You are a good teacher...
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        Lejan .

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        Dec 22 2012: 'Wow!! You bring up important points.'

        Really? Which ones? Did I miss something in my own writing ... ? :o)

        Yet again, Germans are not as complicated as we seem, and we do not use the word 'love' often in between us, as we reserved it to express our feelings for our cars ... ;o)

        I think in what you said about 'love, pennies and free' you discovered one part of the difference, in which 'our' nations use this term. Unintentionally, I suppose - the discovery, not the use. :o)

        As we have the same freedom to say 'I love you', we choose not to, and if I had to give my best guess why 'we' do so, I would say, that this word is just to 'special', to 'fragile' and spared for the right moments only. At least this is the way I use it and as it was used with me. Repetition makes it become inflationary in 'our' view, and we just have this single word for what it stands for ...

        Therefore and on a day to day basis we use the expression 'Ich mag Dich' (I like you) or 'Ich habe Dich lieb' (I somewhat love you ... ;o) instead and as much as I can tell, it works as well ... :o)

        Personally I had to get used to the way this word is used in your country, and I never use it in the English language for any other reason as for I use it in mine, by the fact, that to me it just doesn't 'feel' right. And no, not because I am a man an therefore 'naturally' reluctant ... ;o)

        Now you got me thinking and not only to write you a nice Christmas present... :o)

        No, I do not recall a single time that any of my parents ever told me that they love me. Or that I told them. There was no need to say it. It was obvious. Such as a cloudless sky is blue at day. I just know and therefore have no need to name it ...

        Well, what do you expect of tribes who fought against the blessings of Roman civilization and succeeded? :o)

        Therefore and as a child I got to hear a lot of 'Ich habe Dich lieb mein kleiner Spatz', which would translate into something like 'I love you (a little bit) my little sparrow' ... :o
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        Lejan .

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        Dec 22 2012: If there is one person you should never name a good teacher for the German language, it would be me! I hate grammar, never really understood it, got confused when people tried to explain it to me, and passed my classes 'just' good enough to move on with it ...

        Language to me is a matter of 'feeling' only, and any of my former teacher would still kill me for this statement. :o) My orthography and reading ability developed very slowly and almost stagnated at young age, to finally hop into existence within a view month ... and of course after that year finals ... :o)

        Your sectioning was pretty successful so far, as you separated correctly the constant part '"Wir lieben ..." from the variable part '... Dich (You) and '...Sie' (You, formal).

        The German languages has a different use of small and capital letters even within a sentence and besides Names. Anything we do, which are verbs, is written in lower case. And as 'love' is something we do, the 'lieben' part of your section "Wir Lieben ..." is written 'Wir lieben ...' in low case. But all of this is nothing but boring detail compared to what it states ... to LOVE! :o)

        I hope you will forgive me that I could not wrap this present for you for Christmas, as no one on TED has spread any idea about virtual wrapping paper so far ...:o)

        Have a good and merry time!
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          Dec 22 2012: Thank you Lejan, your present has arrived containing much more value and beauty than any superficial and passive wrapping or a plastic that would take mother Earth 10,000 years to remove!!

          I hear what you are saying and I appreciate, very much, receiving this information first hand.

          We all come from different thinking and ideas. The good has been there all along and it has gotten us this far. I feel we are attracted to TED and have come "on board", because we all agree that we can't just be passive bystanders and hope that the world makes itself a heaven for us. That is our job. What the past generations did, has created a 'mess' that we have little time to change, before it becomes the problem for our children. " You can not expect to solve a problem with the same thinking that caused it." - as put by Albert Einstein. We are living in a very special time. We are the only generation who is collectively 'awake' enough to realize that if we don't step up and act in setting a better course, history just goes around repeating. So we are the change.

          I feel our most important effort needs to be in making sure we are understood correctly. This is the only obstacle to peace. And living in "fear" is not living (as Ronny so well expresses) and ignorance is not affordable any longer.

          What I am learning from our conversation is that, while growing up, when one is subjected to respectful daily acts of love, one does not need to hear the spoken words, that this is enough to fortify a human being and nurture their growth into a productive, peaceful and responsible adult.
          I agree. Actions are what counts. "I like you" or "I somewhat love you" would freak people out here too.

          This is wonderful education and you should not disqualify yourself as a teacher. I know that your teachers would be proud to know this today. And you'd be surprised, they might even go as far as saying the "L" word.
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        Lejan .

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        Dec 23 2012: I wish I could share your positive and encouraging view on this generational awakening, yet in fact and reality, I grew tired in being that change I wanted to see, as I did not find much to any support within a new formed society, which silently shifted towards a bleak hamster wheel fuel without any awareness or question about its overall purpose...

        I took a break from nearly breaking to regain momentum, faith and purpose for the rest of my path, its direction and destination... TED is just one of many sources I am tapping, yet it has this very nice section for exchanging minds. :o)

        Since the fall of the iron curtain, Germany shifted silently yet steadily from a social democracy towards a profit craving and predatory capitalism, which left to may people behind a decent existence. Two days ago, the new poverty statistics was released by the media, and it reported an alarming rise in numbers of people in Germany who dropped below the poverty line by even having a full time job they work on!

        At the same time, 'we', as the EU, are pumping billions into bail out programs of nations to only finance a rotten yet all mighty banking industry by pledging the financial burden to following generations, who are young children and toddlers at the moment and got nothing to do with it at all...

        'We' expect countries like Greece, Spain, Portugal and others to have their people go on a diet, so that this newly turned parasitic 'system' can move on with its business as usual ...

        I highly agree with your concept, that 'ignorance is not affordable any longer', yet it is been given out in new and high doses on extra large spoons yet another time and yet again ...

        About my language teachers I wasn't joking, just exaggerating that they would kill me. I did not count how many times I ended in a dispute about the necessity and quantity of grammar lessons when I was a student, especially the ones of my own language, as I already used it instinctively correct, so why bother? :o)
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          Dec 25 2012: You are a great teacher. And you can tell your old teachers that I discovered this :-))
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          Dec 27 2012: Lejan, wo bist du mein Freund ...... Ronny kam zu uns :-) meine Mutter sagt, dass zu diesem Zeitpunkt sie mit Wehen .. 24 Stunden vor meiner Geburt begonnen .. Es wird eine sein, großes Geburtstagsgeschenk für mich morgen (und dies ist ein sehr egoistischer Bemerkung von mir;-) :-).
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        Lejan .

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        Dec 27 2012: Ich bin wieder hier, Juliette und es scheint, gerade rechtzeitig für Deine guten Neuigkeiten!

        Juliette, are you telling me that you or your mother is going to give birth tomorrow to a new little being named Ronny? Will you become a mom or a sister? No matter how often I read your beautifully phrased lines in (my) German language, this 'little' yet all changing 'detail' did not become clear to me... :o)

        Yet in either case, there is nothing less egoistic and more welcoming for Ronny than this your caring anticipation! Even without being born he already has you waiting for him in joy - so how much better than this can he make his first breath than in this close circle of love?

        I am happy for you and this beautiful news! Happy Birthday to you two!

        Your remark on this 'egoistic' delight reminded me on what my mother once told me what she was silently thinking by herself when she gave birth to my brother and me and in this beautiful moment of joy when she got to hold us in her arms for the very first time ... That children are nothing but gifts which are 'just' lend for a limited time only to their parents, as they are heading from start into their very own lives...

        I think this too, and found, that caring parents who knew when to 'let go' later in time are at no risk to ever 'loose' their children when those are forming and walking their own ways ... :o)

        But now to you! :o) How do you manage to continuously surprise me? This time you wrote in German as if this was a peace of cake ... :o) How did you do that? Is your last name 'Zahn' a hint on at least one part of your ancestors origin? And this time you can not 'blame' me and those 'teaching skills' you claim to have discovered to be responsible for your surprising writing abilities in this difficult language of mine ... :o)

        Also, wie hast Du das gemacht? Was ist das Geheimnis Deines Könnens? Magst Du es mir eines Tages verraten? :o)
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          Dec 28 2012: Thank you. And thank you also for the encouragement :-):-) Are you saying that it is snowing there :-) :-) We are in need of some snow (badly). Had none for ~2yrs. So snow deprivation, too much rain, little day light, etc....I am touched by the fact that Ron Edry graced us here!! Now we can say "we love you" in Hebrew :-) and that is a great birthday present for me!! (another 'egoistic' delight). That is a wonderful story about your Mom... it is a 124 of 124 on the Happiness Index!! !!

          Gross National Happiness Index:

          It won't surprise you that the term was coined in 1972 by Bhutan's fourth Dragon King, since Bhutan has the highest GHI !!

          Seven parameters are measured:

          Economic Wellness
          Environmental Wellness
          Physical Wellness
          Mental Wellness
          Workplace Wellness
          Social Wellness
          Political Wellness

          Here's a good article I am reading: http://www.grossnationalhappiness.com

          And Bhutan http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/365-photos/bhutan-snowman-trek/
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          Dec 30 2012: An early teacher :-) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYM84n-2Sas
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        Lejan .

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        Dec 31 2012: How often do you have birthdays during this year without snow, to much rain and little light? If it is more than once, you hopefully share your secret with me, just for the presents, of course and less for the age ... :o)

        So can it be that I completely misunderstood your other message, and that no birth is given at all? Anyway, I liked the Bunny and remembered the good old days of my childhood... :o)

        Even as a German I was very close to say, that I LOVE the Gross National Happiness Index the very first time I came to hear about it. Since that time Bhutan hopped on my personal world map, which, compared to a real one, is pretty incomplete ... :o)

        A nation who coined this term first, must have beautiful people, especially if they kept it ever since!

        Compared to any other number any nation produces every year, this is what it should all be about, as this is what makes us human and not just 'human resources'! So thank you for bringing this up!

        And your snow deprivation may get reduced a little by the following:

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tuf61OjvoPQ

        :o)
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          Jan 4 2013: Very helpful & accurate !! When watching, I was thinking that “ the self-conscious aim of Life is to find expression - and Art - offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realize that energy" (in the words of Oscar Wilde) - (und das ist das geheimnis meines könnens:-)Thank you mir geholfen zu artikulieren, dass ich in der Kunst glauben !!

          http://www.gravityglue.com
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          Jan 17 2013: Dear Lejan;

          I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this small pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

          Thank you .
          ( To know about the prize, see my comment to Ronny )
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        Lejan .

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        Jan 18 2013: Dear Juliette,

        to be able to accept the honorable Zahn Peace Prize, as I didn't feel to have contributed anything noteworthy to this your conversation and remarkable idea, I imposed myself to the translation of the beautiful TED talk of Ronny Edry into German, which this talk is still missing. So after a very interesting afternoon of word-finding problems and 'in between words' translation attempts, I finally casted my first version today to let it cool for a while to read through it again and with a bit of distance from it.

        Also today I sent out my application to become a TED translator, which is necessary to get the talk subtitled and if TED is not rejecting and a revision translator not laughing about my 'first work', you will then be the cause of the German translation of Ronny Edry's talk and me maybe a bit worthy to finally be able to accept your prize... :o)

        I'll keep you updated on the process, if you wish, which from TED's side may take up to 7 days...

        In any case, thanks to you I came across some remarkable ideas, those of your parents and those of Ronny Edry, which in both cases I would never have stumbled across.

        So my thanks goes to you und mein herzlichster Dank!
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          Jan 19 2013: Thank you Lejan. I am touched by your words and knowing that I have helped or inspired in this way. It is most meaningful to me. I can't wait for you to hear back from TED. Definitely let me know!

          (I am sending you this note here but after you receive it I will delete this from my comment - Did you mean to put a 'z' in your last word....line 10 from top. Or last word in your second paragraph - I just mention this in case you wanted to make the minor Type - O correction - before our conversation freezes for all eternity ;-)
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        Lejan .

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        Jan 20 2013: What a Freudian slip! No prize without a price, right? :o) Thank you for correcting me! It would not have been my first typo in TED's eternity though, yet one carrying its message... :o) I did my correction and you can keep your note if you wish, for general education reasons... :o)

        TED already accepted me, yesterday, just before bedtime and so l entered the hallowed halls of Amara, its on-line translation platform, almost sleepwalking, to find out, that Ronny Edry's talk is already in translation progress of about 57% in the German language and in draft revision 5 already ... whatever 'draft revision 5' means at Amara... I am a newbie, so I will find out. about it ... :o)

        As the translator is now set, I would like (love... :o) to be able to (at least) review the translation, if the woman who started the work will accept me. I already contacted her for a suggested correction and once I understand how the site really works, I may find out what will be possible on that.

        You made the email option available in your TED profile, so I'll keep you informed from time to time how things are doing... :o)
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          Jan 20 2013: I am so glad to know your results and know of the 'places you will go'......cheers!

          General education is my objective for being at TED. Do you really think I should keep the note regarding the typ-o correction since at the same time I like to leave my best foot print on the path ;-) Yet it takes 2 and I do like your explanation :)
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        Jan 20 2013: That's why I used 'to wish' regarding your note, so you are free to choose the best foot prints possible... :o)

        But remember, scientists in two million years who dig out TED's old hard-drives will have trouble to reconstruct this part of our conversation, as my answers won't have any link to your words before... :o) Yet they could preserve beautiful and 'digitally fossilized' footprints ... :o) Just as you wish... :o)
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          Jan 20 2013: ....Now the paradox of choice ;-)....I work well with a blank canvas. I don't know for sure, but my understanding of it is that what we write here, our conversation, loops infinitely in cyberspace as part of a permanent library. I am less concerned about two million years from now, and more concerned about leaving a less confusing 'map' for the immediate next generation (now on the Earth since 11-7 years) who will fall off these cliffs if we don't build these bridges and for whom we are desperately trying to make this a better world, as we must.
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          Jan 20 2013: Dear Lejan,

          I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach.

          Soon this session will be closed. Please also see CREDITS. Thank you again for your collaboration.
          Be well :)
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      Dec 22 2012: Afrikaans : ons is lief vir jou

      It takes a lot of repeats :-) I am learning lief ..... it sounds like leaf (from a tree) in English.

      Great link btw. Thank you Xavier!! I like the box option where you can see "Example usage".
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        Dec 22 2012: Hi Juliette,

        Afrikaans is a kind of old Dutch.

        In Dutch it would be: "Wij houden van je."

        I love you./ Ik houd van je. (or) Ik heb je lief.

        Nice story. Your parents spread much light.
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          Dec 22 2012: Hi Frans. Greetings!! Amazing how languages evolve and develop over time...like branches of the same tree trunk ?!

          Wij houden van je

          One of my favorite things to do then and to this day is to try to grab these "strange" words, pull them into my head into a shelf inside my brain. Then I can't wait to go look on the shelf the next morning to see if they are still there. Last night I did this with "ons is lief vir jou" on one shelf and on the shelf next to it I put "Wir lieben Dich". I tried to keep my mind's eye on the words on the shelf until I fell asleep. The first place my attention went to this morning at 5:00 AM, when I was in the process of waking up, was the shelves. On one shelf I found " Wir Lieben" and on the other I found "lief". The other words had escaped in the dark :-)

          My parents.... I think I have a thousand other similar stories from them (somewhere on my shelves)

          p.s. And I have enjoyed picking up the fruits of wisdom that you have sprinkled on the TED path :-) :-) Happy Winter Solstice to you !!
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          Dec 31 2012: Happy New Year Frans - Cheese (imo) is one of the most important inventions / discoveries of man and here is my childhood image of Holland :-)
          http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/365-photos/gouda-cheese-netherlands/
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        Jan 3 2013: Thank you Juliette.
        Cheese and beer the oldest way to conserve food. I love it.
        Is it you on the picture?

        May your love open many hearts. Happy New Year.
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          Jan 3 2013: Ja, dit ben ik;-)
          Ik wens voor jou hetzelfde; Een volledig nieuwe en wonderlijke wereld !!
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          Jan 17 2013: Dear Frans;

          I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this small pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

          Thank you.
          (To know about the prize, see my comment to Ronny)
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          Jan 21 2013: Dear Frans,
          I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach.

          Soon this session will be closed. Please also see CREDITS. Thank you again for your collaboration.
          Be well :)
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      Jan 17 2013: Dear Xavier;

      I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this small pathway with me and for your contributions in 'building peace on time'.

      Thank you.
      (To know about the prize, see my comment to Ronny)
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Xavier,

      I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach.

      Soon this session will be closed. Please also see CREDITS. Thank you again for your collaboration.
      Be well :)
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    Jan 21 2013: List 31 for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we), ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim
    Japanese: Watashi Tatshi Wa Anata O Ai Shite Mas
    Italian: Amiamo voi tutti
    French: Nous vous aimons
    Spanish: los amamos
    Filipino : Mahal namin kayo
    Korean: Sa Lang Hab Ni Da
    Turkish: Sizi Seviyoruz
    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo
    Hawaiian: Aloha kākou
    Chinese: Wo Men Ai Nin
    Arabic : Nouhiboukouma
    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi
    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
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    Jan 21 2013: List 30.......for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim
    Japanese: Watashi Tatshi Wa Anata O Ai Shite Mas
    French: Nous vous aimons
    Spanish: los amamos
    Filipino : Mahal namin kayo
    Korean: Sa Lang Hab Ni Da
    Turkish: Sizi Seviyoruz
    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo
    Hawaiian: Aloha kākou
    Chinese: Wo Men Ai Nin
    Arabic : Nouhiboukouma
    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi
    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
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    Jan 21 2013: " A language is a flash of the human spirit. It's a vehicle through which the soul of each particular culture comes into the material world. Every language is an old-growth forest of the mind, a watershed, a thought, an ecosystem of spiritual possibilities."

    ~ Wade Davis
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    Jan 21 2013: “ The difference between being effective (doing the right things) and being efficient (doing things well whether or not they're important) is oftentimes what you do, not how you do it. The determining factor requires deconstructing fear."

    ~ Tim Ferriss
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    Jan 21 2013: " We all share the same adaptive imperatives. We're all born. We all bring our children into the world. We go through initiation rites. We have to deal with the inexorable separation of death, so it shouldn't surprise us that we all sing, we all dance, we all have art."

    ~ Wade Davis
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    Jan 21 2013: Pam Moran is a very high-tech superintendent. She uses smart boards, she blogs, she Tweets, she does Facebook, she does all this sort of high-tech stuff. She's a technology leader and instructional leader. But in her office, there's this old wooden, weather-worn table, kitchen table -- peeling green paint, it's kind of rickety. Why is this old table in valuable to such a modern, cutting-edge person?

    "You know, I grew up in Southwestern Virginia, in the coal mines and the farmlands of rural Virginia, and this table was in my grandfather's kitchen. And we'd come in from playing, he'd come in from plowing and working, and we'd sit around that table every night. And as I grew up, I heard so much knowledge and so many insights and so much wisdom come out around this table, I began to call it the wisdom table. And when he passed on, I took this table with me and brought it to my office, and it reminds me of him. It reminds me of what goes on around an empty space sometimes."

    ~ Pam Moran
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    Jan 21 2013: "All cultures through all time have constantly been engaged in a dance with new possibilities of life.”

    ~ Wade Davis
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    Jan 21 2013: " We believe that politicians will never accomplish anything. We think that polemics are not persuasive.

    ..what we're doing is a series of journeys to the ethnosphere where we're going to take our audience to places of such cultural wonder that they cannot help but come away dazzled by what they have seen, and hopefully, therefore, embrace gradually, one by one, the central revelation of anthropology: that this world deserves to exist in a diverse way, that we can find a way to live in a truly multicultural, pluralistic world where all of the wisdom of all peoples can contribute to our collective well-being."

    http://www.ted.com/talks/wade_davis_on_endangered_cultures.html
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    Jan 21 2013: Babies are linguistic geniuses and "citizens of the world."

    There is a wondrous openness, utter and complete openness, in the mind of a child.

    " Babies and children are geniuses until they turn seven.....babies master the sounds of the environment they are born into within their first year of life.

    Babies all over the world are "citizens of the world." They can discriminate all the sounds of all languages. As adults we have become culture-bound listeners.

    The first six months are the critical period in development, in which babies try to master which sounds are used in their language -- a model for the rest of language, and critical periods in childhood for social, emotional and cognitive development.

    In studying the child's brain, we uncover deep truths about what it means to be human, and in the process, we may be able to help keep our own minds open to learning for our entire lives."

    http://www.ted.com/talks/patricia_kuhl_the_linguistic_genius_of_babies.html
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    Jan 21 2013: “ A child is born with celestial openness of the mind ”

    ~ Patricia Kuhl
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    Jan 21 2013: Our African ancestors had a geometrical language; 2.5 million years ago.

    Today, the happiest species on the planet is the Bonobo.

    The Bonobo (live in the jungle encircled by the Congo river in central Africa) are similar to an australopithecine like Lucy.

    “We have a lot to learn from Bonobo, because they're a very egalitarian society and they're a very empathetic society."

    Scientists have discovered that Bonobos acquire language, when it’s simply used around them.The driving force in language acquisition is to understand what others, that are important to you, are saying to you. " It's not biology; it's culture.”

    Today we're sharing tools and technology and language with another species peacefully, we could do it, and live in peace and harmony with our own species. None of us, can possibly even imagine what a beautiful life we can experience when we build a peaceful world community culture.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/susan_savage_rumbaugh_on_apes_that_write.html
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    Jan 19 2013: List 29.......for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim
    French: Nous vous aimons
    Spanish: los amamos
    Filipino : Mahal namin kayo
    Korean: Sa Lang Hab Ni Da
    Turkish: Sizi Seviyoruz
    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo
    Hawaiian: Aloha kākou
    Chinese: Wo Men Ai Nin
    Arabic : Nouhiboukouma
    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi
    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
  • Jan 19 2013: Thank you Juliette for giving me Zahn Peace Prize!
    It's an honor. I mean it :)
    I wish you and the people who share your idea all the best.
    God bless you ..!
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      Jan 19 2013: And you! Dear Elizabeth. It has been a joy to meet you and a pleasure working with you. I hope you will have a chance to read through our thread and receive everyone's input. Soon our thread will be closed off here. At closing I'll post the 'credits', that way if we can't all make a circle physically holding the earth, we will hug mother earth virtually. Thank you for sharing your brilliance with the world!! I will see you again in other TED rooms:) and I hope we get to collaborate again.

      Every day this world is a better place because you are in it.

      I now leave you with this animation that I love;
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mM11v_16-o
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear Elizabeth,
      I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you. Be well :)
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    Jan 17 2013: List 28..............for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim
    French:Nous vous aimons
    Spanish: los amamos

    Filipino : Mahal namin kayo
    Korean: Sa Lang Hab Ni Da

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo

    Hawaiian: Aloha kākou

    Chinese: Wo Men Ai Nin

    Arabic : Nouhiboukouma

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi
    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
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    Jan 14 2013: " The value in a friendship lies in the honoring of differences, not simply in the enjoyment of similarities"
    ........... one of many things I learned from my parents in this process.........
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        Jan 21 2013: Thanks Kate :-) that happens to me all the time !! So I have to go back and look for comments I liked the week before...... The good news is that TED gives you all new thumbs to use again. LOL :-) Now I have 20 minutes to learn how to spell Michelle in Hebrew ;-)
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    Jan 13 2013: List 27..............for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim

    Spanish: los amamos

    Filipino : Mahal namin kayo
    Korean: Sa Lang Hab Ni Da

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo

    Hawaiian: Aloha kākou

    Chinese: Wo Men Ai Nin

    Arabic : Nouhiboukouma

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi
    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
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    Jan 12 2013: List 26..............for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim

    Spanish: los amamos

    Filipino : Mahal namin kayo

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo

    Hawaiian: Aloha kākou

    Chinese: Wo Men Ai Nin

    Arabic : Nouhiboukoum نحبكم

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi
    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
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    Jan 11 2013: List 25..............for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim

    Spanish: los amamos

    Filipino : Mahal namin kayo

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo

    Hawaiian: Aloha kākou

    Chinese: Wo Men Ai Nin

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi
    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
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    Jan 10 2013: List 24..............for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim

    Spanish: los amamos

    Filipino : Mahal namin kayo

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo

    Hawaiian: Aloha kākou

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi
    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
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    Jan 6 2013: List 23........for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim

    Spanish: los amamos

    Filipino : Mahal namin kayo

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi
    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
  • Jan 6 2013: Yourbchoice is the best.
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      Jan 6 2013: Thank you :-)
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      Jan 21 2013: Dear César,

      I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. Also see CREDITS. Soon this session will be closed. Thank you again for your collaboration. Be well :)
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    Jan 6 2013: List 22........for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim

    Spanish: los amamos

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi

    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
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    Jan 5 2013: List 21........for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)
    Persian: Maa Doostetoon Daarim

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi

    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
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    Dec 31 2012: List 20........for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi

    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    Faroese: Vit elska tykkum
    Greenlandic: Asavatsigit
    Hungarian: Szeretünk
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    Dec 28 2012: I am wishing that Alberto Cairo would write here in Afghani!!

    Well, I am sure my wish is on its way Alberto, but since the gates are scheduled for closing on this conversation session in 47 minutes, I will make one entry in your name. The more important one would be for Afghanistan in Afghani, but unfortunately, I could not find that on the internet search yet.

    So this is in your honor,
    (in your birth tongue, which I hope is somewhat in the vicinity, from google translation department) :

    Italian: amiamo tutti voi
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    Dec 27 2012: " It is not about the past, it is about the future. A better future starts now. "

    ~ Ronny Edry
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    Dec 27 2012: List 17 .....for 2013:

    Hebrew : anahnou ohavim ot-hem
    anahnou (we) , ohavim (love,) ot-hem (you)

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo (yup, same as the Bosnian)
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo (:-))

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi

    Danish: vi elsker jer
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
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    Dec 27 2012: List 16.......for 2013:

    Bosnian: Mi vas volimo
    Croatian: Mi vas volimo (yup, same as the Bosnian)
    Serbian: Mi vas volimo (:-))

    Makedonian: Ve sakame
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
    Polish: Kochamy was
    Russian: My vas lyubim
    Bulgarian: Obichame vi

    Danish: Vi elsker jer
    Norwegian: Vi elsker deg
    Swedish: Vi älskar er
    • Dec 27 2012: Actually the Norwegian "Vi elsker deg" is the singular form. "Vi elsker dere" is the plural. As in the Danish "vi elsker dig" (singular) /"vi elsker jer" (plural)
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        Dec 27 2012: O' ..........my bad.....i will correct it

        Danish: We love you (2or more) -----------------vi elsker jer

        Norwegian: We love you (2or more) ------------- vi elsker dere
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    Dec 26 2012: WE

    "If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other."

    ~ Mother Teresa
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    Dec 26 2012: ¡Feliz Navidad! Buon Natale! З Калядамі Хрыстовым! 聖誕快樂! Joyeux Noël! Glædelig jul! חג שמח! क्रिसमस की शुभकामनाएँ! Nollaig Shona! 메리 크리스마스! ຍິນດີວັນຄຣິດສະມາດ! کریسمس مبارک! Feliz Natal! Crăciun fericit! Счастливого Рождества! God jul! Wesołych Świąt! สุขสันต์วันคริสต์มาส! Noel kutlu olsun! Giáng sinh vui vẻ! Καλά Χριστούγεννα! Frohe Weihnachten! Gelukkig kerstfeest! Merry Christmas!
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    Dec 24 2012: List 7.......for 2013

    Danish: Vi elsker jer
    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda

    Silent Night Greetings..
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    Dec 23 2012: List 6.........for 2013

    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
    Yoruba: A nife yin.
    Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda


    This goes right under the Christmas tree for opening soon;-)
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    Dec 23 2012: Infinite loop :-)
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    Dec 22 2012: There is Afrikaans but there is no Zulu; I would have said you've got the A to Z of African languages.......
    But how come no Nigerian visited you?
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      Dec 23 2012: Hello Feysayo, So glad you joined us..unfortunately no Nigerian visited then :(...I was just thinking how many native speakers we would be able to have us join this time.....there are now 6500 languages in the world!!!?? About 2000 are spoken by fewer than 1000 people. Of the remaining 4500, I would be happy if we could double the number of my childhood list. After all todays connectivity methods are supposedly much more efficient!!
      Will you tell us the Zulu?
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        Dec 23 2012: Yoruba: A nife yin.
        Zulu: Ngiyakuthanda
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          Dec 23 2012: Two languages!! Thank you.
          We have loved the drumming music of Yoruba.
          and I use Zulu every time I have to spell my name ;-):-)

          Meanwhile:

          ~~ Oniruru ikini ~~
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          Jan 17 2013: Dear Feyisayo;

          I hope you accept the Zahn Peace Prize for your participation in this idea, for co-authoring this small pathway with me and for your contributions in building peace on time.

          Thank you.
          (To know about the prize, see my comment to Ronny)
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          Jan 21 2013: Dear Feyisayo,

          I hope you will have a chance to read through all the entries to our thread and find them helpful in your general approach. I thought of you when I heard Wade Davis' suggestion that the next ( unifying ) language could be Yoruba :-)

          Soon this session will be closed. Please also see CREDITS. Thank you again for your collaboration.
          Be well :)
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    Dec 22 2012: List 4.........for 2013

    Afrikaans: Ons je lief vir jou
    German: Wir lieben Sie
    Dutch: Wij houden van je
    English: We love you
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      Lejan .

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      Dec 23 2012: Did you know, that 'We love you' is doubtful to reach equilibrium in back & forth translation with Japanese?

      http://translationparty.com


      The cute idea behind this site is explained here:

      http://googlesystem.blogspot.de/2009/08/google-translate-equilibrium.html

      :o)
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        Dec 23 2012: I don't know why my reply to you ended up top ? So I post it again below.
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        Dec 23 2012: The low probability of reaching equilibrium - for our phrase in Japanese-means that there is an infinite loop!! A term I had only heard before in computer software :-) The computer doesn't crash, it simply goes on and on and on and on and :-)

        Artistic expressions are obviously quite sophisticated and refined in that culture. I see poetic beauty infused in every aspect of life. So I would expect a complex expression. Recently, at a Japanese cultural event, I asked if people say "I love you" on a regular basis. The answer was quite unexpected. "No!!":-l What came next was; " we always show in action." ..then I understood better :-)...I still would like to know a speakable Japanese phrase :-) because a bridge has one leg in one side and one in the other.....even suspended ones:-)