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Bradley Breeden

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Change the way we educate our children.

We know that disruptive thinking is one of the best ways to innovate, so why do we work so hard to change that mind set in our children. Let me start when I had this thought. Several years ago I agreed to build (well help build, my 7 year old insisted he would do most of the work) my son a tree house. I started by asking him how he wanted it to look, size, height, etc. At 7 years old it was quite possible that this tree house was going to be two stories, have an elevator, running water, electricity and a throne room (this was his castle phase). Obviously this wasn't going to happen but to see him do what we call thinking out the box was refreshing. Flash forward 8 years and my son no longer thinks like that. Some would call in maturing but at what point is mature to mature. One thing I noticed was the way we educate. It's not here's a problem now how would you solve it, it's this is how you solve this problem now practice. What we lose is the disruptive thinking that leads to great innovation. In giving kids the ability to think freely, innovate and yes fail, we give them what success is built on. I think we need to focus more on letting a child come up with his or her own ideas then explore why they may or may not work. I hear too much of ‘that’s a great idea but let us try this'. What I would like to hear is 'that's a great idea; let us look into that a bit'.

Topics: education
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  • Dec 8 2012: Thanks for the complement.

    I even made an educators version, called MyReadingMapped-For-Schools, that offers a select group of my blog's 100 Google Maps, complete with lesson questions and summaries based on the input of educational technology consultant, Carol LaRow, who is advising me on how to make it acceptable to educators.

    But as for sprucing it up, the maps have 40,000 visitors from 153 countries, speaking 102 languages who seem to like just the way they are. The blog design has a similar look to the many Google Maps that are on the site, and is designed within the limitations of Blogger. I research the subjects, research the locations, plot the maps, write the blog, and find an audience. Since its free, I can't afford a professional web designer, so I do it within my web design skill set. I was a much better print designer than I ever was a web designer. The technology issues just seem to get in the way of an effective design. Besides, as a marketing person, I always felt it best to have the site communicate and be searchable rather than be well designed.

    Most visitors bookmark or favorite the original Google Map and have little need for the blog site other than to find other maps. The Google Map account mapview count is twice that of the blog pageview count.

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