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If there is so much aid in developing countries, why poverty is increasing in these regions and the industrialized world?

I'm doing a question for my project. Not only that poverty is increasing in the developing world for the worse, it is increasing in the industrialized world, especially the United States.

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  • Dec 28 2012: Without individual freedom and property rights enforced by the rule of constant and known laws, no amount of aid from the outside can help a developing country, whereas any developing country with those basic building blocks would never need aid. Recall - The USA was once a 'developing country' and now leads the world in virtually every field of endeavor. It's not a coincidence that it was founded on the principle of individual sovereignty with the government's sole job being to preserve and protect those rights (a founding principle that we have ignored to our detriment, but that is another story).
    • Dec 28 2012: "Without individual freedom and property rights enforced by the rule of constant and known laws, no amount of aid from the outside can help a developing country,"

      Property rights are acknowledged in almost every country and indivdual freedoms only have to be above some base level that is already being met by many, if not most developing nations, more importantly they have to be accepted by society. The industrial revolution apparently didn't require equal rights for slaves, women, atheists and gay people.
      • Dec 30 2012: JS - Looks like you didn't read "enforced by the rule of constant and known laws" part of my statement, even though you successfully cut/pasted it. Also, the concept of rights being 'accepted by society' is one that has no clear meaning to me - can you elaborate.

        I did not suggest that the US Constitution was drafted without flaws. And, in order, - deferring the topic of slavery was a compromise that the founders made in the hope that the nation they were forming would resolve the matter later; they believed that forming the union was more likely to result in the end of slavery than not forming it. Women were free, they merely could not vote, and in a limited powers government, the franchise is not so fundamentally important. Compared to virtually every woman in every modern developing country, the women of 18th century America enjoyed were lived in nirvana. Atheists - huh? Gay people - besides a few incidental privileges that confer with matrimony - ALL but a few tax savings can be had by contract legal protections are gay people living without in America?
        • Dec 30 2012: "JS - Looks like you didn't read "enforced by the rule of constant and known laws" part of my statement, even though you successfully cut/pasted it."

          Apart from outlyers such as Somalia and Afghanistan property rights are enforced in most countries, even in Africa.

          "Also, the concept of rights being 'accepted by society' is one that has no clear meaning to me - can you elaborate."

          If we take the example of homosexuality, there are countries where this is legal, but no one would hire you if you came out of the closet.

          "Women were free, they merely could not vote, and in a limited powers government, the franchise is not so fundamentally important. Compared to virtually every woman in every modern developing country, the women of 18th century America were lived in nirvana."

          Do you really believe that? Being married was a legally valid reason for getting fired and married women could not own property.

          "Atheists - huh? Gay people - besides a few incidental privileges that confer with matrimony - ALL but a few tax savings can be had by contract legal protections are gay people living without in America?"

          Yes, now, after centuries of struggle, but it wasn't so during the industrial revolution. Even today many countries are booming even though they have no real democracy and/or freedom of speech and freedom of/from religion.

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