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What are some big social issues that need to be discussed, but aren't?

There are a lot social issues, but which ones are the most un-talked about and important?

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  • Dec 13 2012: @Krisztian pinter

    "or me, it is an easy decision. any time a company does something evil, it does so with the help of government. "

    This is what you don't get, corporations _have no need_ of government they can still get away with even more if you reduce the size (and power) of government because they have the _resources_. You keep forgetting this. The problem is not an easy one because money is power in market society and markets _are not_ self correcting, people will _not_ vote with their dollars because the system simply doesn't work according to how you think it does.

    One only has to look at STEAM. Steam's success rides on the back of public ignorance of technology and general lack of intelligence in the gaming population, steam is DRM and it needed no government intervention it used propaganda techniques and a trojan horse strategy (take their popular games, forcibly embed steam within it, have ignorant unconcerned illiterate public buy/use it). Steam needed no help from government to get away with taking away your rights to own your own software because _they don't need government do this_ they can come up with all sorts of loopholes to get away with it with or without government because technology allows all sorts of shenanigans (like taking computer code hostage, see: Diablo 3 auctionhouse)

    The company can create and invent around any attempt by redefining rights removal in language.

    Another good example is pollution, modern multi-nationals and businesses are always looking to externalize and offload risk (cost) onto either 1) environment or 2) people and people simply will not react fast enough or with enough numbers because there are huge confounding factors like: awareness, intelligence, education, etc.

    This is why markets are not self correcting and trying to apply ideological principles to a reality that does not work according to them will always end in failure.
    • Dec 13 2012: Having resources is no guarantee of anything. Microsoft had all kinds of resources, and still they are taking a beating in the phones marketplace these days. Apple and Microsoft are acting like a** ****s now only because they get to enforce injunctions for their silly patents WITH government assistance.

      What Steam does is not propaganda. That's not what the word means. You don't have a right to software or games. Steam is not taking away your rights by enforcing some prerequisites for playing their games. Don't like it? Don't buy their games. As simple as that.

      Contrast this with the Apple tax that other phone companies have to pay. You, the customer, pay that tax even if you have sworn off Apple.

      Pollution: many companies abuse lax laws in other countries and pollute them. They are able to do so because the governments there don't do their only legitimate role: protecting the rights of their citizens. I have a right to clean air in my own house. And yet, if I were to stay in some polluted Asian country, the big industry next door spews chemicals into the air, and the government does nothing to protect my rights in my own house.

      Good ideology is the only way out. Make sure you understand capitalist ideology before you embark on debunking it. Otherwise, we sink deeper and deeper into the mess we are making all over the world these days. How did this mess happen?
      • Dec 13 2012: "Having resources is no guarantee of anything."

        You're wrong and an idiot, the fact that we already have these companies infringing on our rights is proof that you're wrong.

        Just because you want to allow people to sell themselves into slavery doesn't mean it's ok or a good idea.

        Just because something is entered into does not mean it is good.
        • Dec 13 2012: @Bob Stiglitz:
          Don't mistake your pathetic reading comprehension for a reflection on my intelligence.

          "the fact that we already have these companies infringing on our rights is proof that you're wrong."
          What the heck are you talking about now? Steams activities are not an infringement. Companies dumping chemicals into rivers IS an infringement. But first of all, do you understand what "private property" is? You can understand infringement only if you comprehend private property. The game company did not sell you a game. If it is really yours, don't you think you can make copies of it and sell that to other people. Do you understand what "license" means? All they ever sold you was a license to play a particular game. There were terms and conditions to the license which you could reject, and thus, not sign up for the license.

          "Just because you want to allow people to sell themselves into slavery doesn't mean it's ok or a good idea."
          Now THIS is a reflection on your intelligence. What next? I am a slave to my local cinema just because they have made restrictions on what I can bring with me to the cinema?

          "Just because something is entered into does not mean it is good."
          I asked you how this MESS happened, and you're telling me not to assume it is good. Is there such a thing as "good mess"?
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          Dec 13 2012: This is where that thumbs down icon would come in real handy.

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