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Robert Winner

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Should cursive writing be required in schools?

Only three state have made cursive a part of the core curriculum requirements while 45 states require proficiency in computer keyboarding at the elementry level. Some states have made cursive optional.

Has our society advanced to the point of where handwriting has become unnecessary.

What impacts can you see on not being able to write in cursive. Could printing be just as acceptable?

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    Nov 27 2012: Robert,It would not hurt to teach kids to write in cursive. Personally, I feel that it takes less effort to write in cursive because you lift the pen/pencil off the paper less frequently...and it looks more elegant.
    My 5 year old son prints the alphabets. Both myself and my husband write in cursive, so we are teaching him to write in cursive at home. I do hope that handwriting does not become a lost art.
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      Nov 27 2012: Madhavi, As a Pharmacist you could attest to cursive becoming a lost art every time you try to decipher a Doctors penmanship.

      The next time you go to the school look at the displays of student work on the walls and you can tell that cursive is in real trouble.

      When I went to school my cave master spent a lot of time to ensure that we chisled each letter correctly. A stone with errors would get a reduced grade and all of the other hunter gathers would make fun of you.

      Thanks for the reply. All the best. Bob.
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        Nov 28 2012: Bob, I had a similar cave master in India who made me chisel stones as well. I wonder if the cave masters have become extinct :-)
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          Nov 28 2012: Yes. Think about this. If you raised you children the same as you were raised you would go to jail. My teachers were task masters and very strict. They also taught my parents and when the parents were called in the teacher would admonish them and then I would catch holy Ned when they got home. If I got swats at school I got more when I got home.

          Dr Spock and other "do gooders" changed all of that. To bad. We had a better grip on world events and core subjects than we do now.

          Thanks for the reply. Bob.
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      Dec 1 2012: 'I do hope that handwriting does not become a lost art.'

      Your reference of handwriting being ART is not just beautiful, it actually explains the decline of cursive writing in industrialized countries.

      The first time I came to learn 'block letters' officially was in technical drawing class. The whole set of letters was even normed, as well as spacing, line distance, stroke width, etc.

      Each standardisation sacrifices individuality, each norm sacrifices expression.

      At some train stations in Europe, if one is lucky, you can still find the most beautifully crafted and designed cast iron columns from the turn of the century, which only technical purpose is to hold the platform canopy.

      http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6065/6156684900_d844cfabfc_z.jpg

      Compared to what we build today, it becomes quite obvious that we impoverished or form of expression in less than a hundred years:

      http://paradalis.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/bahnsteig-1.jpg?w=655


      The Art of Writing seems to face the same impoverishment in our everyday lives ...
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        Dec 2 2012: Thanks Lejan. You make a good point!
      • Dec 3 2012: I don't understand why anyone would want a column like THAT to hold up a canopy.

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