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Arkady Grudzinsky

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Should we feel gratitude for our life? To whom?

Gratitude is important feeling in interpersonal relationships. Gratitude encourages giving and giving encourages more gratitude, etc. On the other side, lack of gratitude comes with a sense of "entitlement" - they mutually create each other as well. Lack of gratitude discourages giving and creates a sense that the world "owes us" a living. "We are programmed to receive." Gratitude, in my opinion, offers an exit from that proverbial Hotel California and "programs us to give".

How about our life and other things shown in this video? Religious people usually thank God for these things. The camera shows a standing round of applause at the end of the video. I very much doubt that most people attending TED talks are religious, so the video must have stirred some emotion in believers and non-believers alike.

Do non-believers feel gratitude for these things? If yes, to whom?

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        Nov 24 2012: Re: "If you are more of an introvert, with excellent Mindsight, the "target" need only be a thought, within the mind."

        Excellent point...

        "You don't look out there for God, something in the sky, you look in you."
        Alan Watts

        "The kingdom of God does not come with your careful observation, nor will people say, ‘Here it is,’ or ‘There it is,’ because the kingdom of God is within you."
        Luke 17
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      Nov 24 2012: Does amazement prompt you to do good things to other people?
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          Nov 24 2012: Why do you need an attitude that doesn't prompt you to do anything?
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          Nov 25 2012: No. I just recently discovered him. I will.

          Actually, I realize that I made my question somewhat loaded and provoking. Perhaps, intentionally. My opening statement implies that it's somehow morally wrong not to feel gratitude. On the other hand, considering something that just "happens" to us as a gift is, perhaps, seeing something that does not exist, "seeing things as we are" rather than "seeing things as they are". It may stand in the way of perceiving reality. And perceiving reality without pushing our agendas on it is important. Your perception may be more reflective than mine.

          So, thank you for sharing your view.

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