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Marlon Jones

GED Program Director/ Instructor, Wright Career College

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"...but I'll defend to the death your right to say it… Really?"

Voltaire once said “I do not agree with what you have to say, but I'll defend to the death your right to say it” Would I? Really? While maybe not dead, civility is definitely paralyzed in our country, in our communities, and in our homes. At what point did it become easier to antagonize, patronize, and vilify the “other” instead of conducting a reasoned discussion about the perplexing issues that surround us? Well into the machinations of the most recent elections it was being reported by various media sources that Americans were more divided than during any other time in history. There is simply something that does not sound quite right about that statement. Is it possible to have an honest and reasoned discussion? Is it possible to objectively consider an opposing point of view? Do we even agree on what the problems are? Disagreements are inevitable but being disagreeable is not. What do you think?

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    Nov 20 2012: Re: "it was being reported by various media sources that Americans were more divided than during any other time in history."

    Why is it bad? Isn't it an evidence of a balanced society?

    What really divides the nation is statements like this. It seems to be done on purpose, to pit people against each other. Do you remember how the issue of gay marriages became hot? I clearly remember listening to the radio in my car, when 9/11 was still hot, war in Iraq started to turn sour, economy was down after the dotcom crash, and Bush heading towards reelection. Then he addressed the nation with his resolution to "preserve family values" by opposing gay marriage. Guess what was the hottest issue during the next elections? It was not economy and not war in Iraq.

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