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Andy Loi

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What strategies does the military use to train soldiers to kill?

For a human being to kill another human being is definitely not a natural and easy thing to do. Soldiers who go to war are faced with many dangers and very often, unpredictable. In order to survive and not get killed by their enemies, they must kill them before the others do.

What are the processes and strategies that the military use to alter mind of a human being to become a soldier is not afraid of taking another people's life?

Soldiers from the Vietnam war were trained to survive surprise attacks. Killing becomes their instinct when they are faced with danger or even surprise.

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  • Nov 7 2012: Hi Fritzie,

    I am a university student currently studying at the Ontario College of Art and Design University within the graphic design degree program.

    Presently, I am undertaking a project based on an original primary research generated from the form of an interview or conversation. The goal is to find someone that I can talk to (who I have never met before) who has specialized knowledge in a field that I believe my peers would find intriguing. Most importantly, the topic/subject must be in the area of my interest.

    The ultimate goal is to find an opportunity for me as an academic student to learn something that I have always wanted to learn and to utilized my graphic design skills to re-create this conversation into an interesting layout format.

    My objective here is to seek an individual to speak to someone who has been in the war, possibly in Vietnam, Korea, or in the Middle East regions. I am interested in finding out about their experience during their service and training.

    The area of interest and questions lies within the topics of resistance against guerilla warfare and the training process of resisting guerilla warfare. These might include their experience on the battlefield, their experience in defending from enemies’ ambush, and how they survived these ambushes.

    Andy
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      Nov 7 2012: Thank you, Andy for this explanation.

      I think you might want to revise your question statement to indicate that you are specifically interested in a response from actual combat veterans. Otherwise you are likely to get lots of theories from those without immediate experience who are able mainly to theorize for you about human nature without actually knowing what military training includes..

      You have probably thought of this, but I hope you are also posing your question to places where there might be a concentration of combat veterans.

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