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Fritzie -

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What are the implications for learners of Massive Open Distance Courses?

Daphne Koller in her TED talk describes what she sees as the potential of her new initiative, Coursera, which provides courses from a host of major universities, free of charge, to anyone with a computer and interest in learning. Harvard and MIT followed suit with a similar initiative, edX, which does the same. Most major universities in the United States seem to be commited to one collaboration or the other.

At this point there are two big differences between these massive courses and courses in traditional settings. One is that active online interactions among students replace in-person interactions among those who attend a course in the classroom. Another is that students have no actual contact with or feedback from teaching staff, either to answer questions or to provide expert feedback on assignments. Students instead get feedback from peers, which I believe follows a point rubric rather than being narrative, but I am not sure how much variation there is in the style of feedback.

What will these MODCs mean for learners? Thoughts from those actually taking courses through Coursera, edX, or other distance learning initiatives are particularly welcome here!

If you would never contemplate taking such a course, why not?

Topics: education
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    Nov 12 2012: Fritzie, I was excited when Coursera was introduced. I enrolled in a few introductory courses pertaining to my interests and curiosity. Modern and Contemporary American Poetry, Principles to macroeconomics, Introduction to sociology to name a few. The flexibility that the MDOCs offer for many time starved students is a great advantage. Students who are unsure ,if they want to pursue a primary degree/career path in their subject of interest, have an opportunity to take one of the introductory courses. This is a great avenue to expand one's knowledge base!

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