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Anil Rajvanshi

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Debate: Is corruption a moral or a legal issue?

Too often the corruption debate and discussions all over the world are focused on how somebody broke a law. By that definition Mahatma Gandhi was the most corrupt man since he periodically broke British laws!

By dictionary definition corruption relates to doing things which are not ethical.

Hence how should the corruption be defined and fought for greater good?

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    Oct 23 2012: I would say 'yes'. It's a moral or a legal issue - depending on what kind of corruption it is. This subject is on every well-intentioned person's mind, has been on their mind probably since the dawn of civilization, has been the prime catalyst for 'alternate' societies and revolutions, and has caused more societal damage than anything else. But we just can't seem to get rid of it. So I ask myself, what causes corruption? Where does it come from? And as i think of it in those terms, I begin to see it as the 'easy way out'. It can't be identified because it's 'subjective', so it's easy to hide. It's reasoning can be agreeable to the uncorrupt and therefore more effective. It can be 'attached' to a host of 'good intentions' and infiltrate designs undetected. It is very successful because the weak of character and ambitious in desire find a route of expression that works and is easy to be good at, and they are not revealed in their corruption until it's too late. The uncorrupt then - because they are uncorrupt - bemoan these results yet are merciful and 'hope the corrupt mend their ways' and try the long road of rehabilitation of the corrupt rather than 'cast them out' or eliminate them permanently because they're 'civilized'- which of course leads to more laws and prisons and increasingly complicated societies. So corruption is successful, profitable, and hard to prove as morally or legally contrary. Sounds like easy money to me.
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      Oct 23 2012: RH. You might enjoy reading about my attempt in trying to understand what causes corruption. http://www.nariphaltan.org/indsearch2011.pdf

      I have tried to look at the sociobiological basis of corruption. Since this talk was given in India hence it is slightly India oriented but the theme of the talk is applicable anywhere in the world.

      Cheers.
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        Oct 23 2012: Thanks Anil. I liked your 'brain as processor' description and how a 'corrupt brain' is lacking in processing ability. Also, I've been a long proponent of investing in the marginalized so they can contribute in the economy. These are the talks that need to be advertised, in the news, on 'prime-time', discussed in the classroom and at the university. I dream of the day when ethics surpass corruption and everyone has enough 'processing power' in their brain to know the difference.
        Cheers to you too my friend.
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          Oct 23 2012: Thanks RH. If you liked the talk please spread the message around in whatever way you think fit.

          Cheers.
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          Oct 23 2012: RH, I share with you the compelling interest in investing in the marginalized to make sure they can contribute effectively in the economic and civic spheres.
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        Oct 24 2012: to Fritzie: Really?! That's great news. I often wonder why it's not done more effectively. Why we allow nearly half of the world's population to not participate. For some reason I cannot quantify, I have a feeling that the ROI - ultimately - would far surpass the the initial investment. I do believe though that there are some very powerful people (Gates/Buffet/Soros) that are looking at this situation in the same manner, and trying to figure out an effective approach. I'm going to ask the question to the TED community.... Thanks.

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