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How does the Sun work?

1. If the Sun is hot: why don't satellites passing much closer to it burn up?

2. If we climb high up a mountain and get closer to the Sun, why is it colder?

3. If the Sun emanates light, why is it dark in space even "under the Sun? Wouldn't it be logical to think that there is some plasma activity radiating out of the Sun through even dark empty space, causing a chemical or nuclear reaction on Earth which creates heat?

Closing Statement from veronika petrics

I think the Sun is more complex and mysterious still to fully know then getting a clear answe here. Thank you all.

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    Oct 22 2012: Good Question --Okay here we go,
    1: 93 million miles is the distance between the Sun and the Earth and sending satellites close to even half that distance is a friction as far as I know .And the ones orbiting earth are obviously made durable enough to withstand the Suns' heat.

    2: *say you are now at sea level(0 meters) u climb up Mt.Everest (8,848 m Mount Everest, Elevation) technicall it (the 8848m) is negligible when compared to 93million miles--->so you are nowhere CLOSE to the sun
    * its because of temperature and pressure that it gets colder
    (http://science.howstuffworks.com/nature/climate-weather/atmospheric/question186.htm)

    3:hmmm okay* humans see only the visible region of the spectrum
    *electrons in the sun are in an excited state(Crazy energy stored)
    *they produce gamma radiations when they return to normal state(we cant see that stuff )
    *now gamma turns into x rays etc.....as it encounters more obstacles from its origin the core to the surface to the Earth and we feel the heat because of the infrared radiations one of the member of the electromagnetic spectrum of which the gamma radiations are also a part of

    And VOILA! knowledge has been Shared hope t'was useful to you =)
  • Oct 23 2012: I thought, the spectroscope can not register temperature. because it does not register the rays which carry the heat force..prisoms are clear white, the heat carrying rays are dark.(Tyndall's experiment )The rays and forces coming out of the Sun are those which control the movements of the bodies of the solar system: MAGNETIC forces.
    I suspect the Sun has a cold fusion body....but creates heat hitting the Earth and planets atmospheres..







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  • Oct 22 2012: twice during the year the Sun is millions of miles nearer to the Earth than other times, at the fall and spring but we do not experience higher temperature.By the way, the deduction that the Sun is an excedingly hot superheated body has been determined by spectroscope..which does not register temperatures..
    • Oct 23 2012: Even those changes in distance are minimal compared to the average distance from the planet to the sun. I do not know where you live, but the temperature you feel is influenced by the angle in which the sun rays hit the planet (among other factors). This is one reason why seasonal changes are more visible farther from the equator. During summer the rays are much more parallel and thus hit more directly (feels warmer).

      A spectroscope detects temperature by the electromagnetic radiation associated to heat, thus it registers heat.

      Make it a point to learn how far is our planet from the sun, rather than just imagine if the distances matter or not and what other factors influence the whole thing. Same goes for learning the actual size of the sun rather than imagine that its light should fill the whole of space. Some web sites can show you relative sizes. It might disappoint you a bit, because when we consider the sizes and the length of the orbits, et cetera, the sun looks very small ...
  • Oct 22 2012: "1. If the Sun is hot: why don't satellites passing much closer to it burn up?"

    The distance between Earth and most satellites is much smaller than the distance between the Earth and the Sun, also, space is very cold because it doesn't retain heat like the Earth's atmosphere does and the Earth's core actually provides the majority of the heat on Earth. A satellite halfway between the Earth and the Sun will still be colder than a satellite standing outside in Siberia.

    "2. If we climb high up a mountain and get closer to the Sun, why is it colder?"

    Again, the height of the mountain is very small compared to the distance between the Earth and the Sun, so being far away from the Earth's warm surface and above the clouds that act as greenhouses, are stronger effects than being closer to the Sun when standing on top of a mountain.

    "3. If the Sun emanates light, why is it dark in space even "under the Sun? Wouldn't it be logical to think that there is some plasma activity radiating out of the Sun through even dark empty space, causing a chemical or nuclear reaction on Earth which creates heat?"

    Barely any plasma from the Sun reaches the Earth at all and most of that doesn't get past the atmosphere, what does get through is too few to do anything on Earth except mess with sensitive electronic equipment when there is a (rare) major solar storm. Light is what we see and light doesn't bend around corners (unless they're tiny corners, smaller than most bacteria).
  • Oct 22 2012: Plasma Physics 101 No wimpy magnetic bottles. Gravity- the mass of all this hydrogen. Use gavity to keep it together.