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Debate: The effects of texting on the next generation.

By excluding our earliest communication channels such as sound and visual cues (non-verbals), are we not creating a species unequipped for interpersonal communication?

Furthermore, producing a byproduct of negative dependency for avoidance, and ultimately alienation?

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Closing Statement from Nicholas Ashley

I would like to extend my earnest gratitude on the thoughts of all who participated, your insight has been valuable and as a whole might be included in a project/paper I am working on for school; I thank you all.
Interesting points made by all, as thought provoking directions guided the discussion into areas I had not thought of yet; some I had. I found it interesting that some din not feel texting affects our ability to interpersonally communicate and that we needn’t be concerned; even chalked it up to similar hysteria resembling past generations. Others found an effect possible, perhaps warranting further exploration. I would have to agree with concerns written language and texting is having a negative effect on the ability to cohesively formulate a properly constructed sentence (academic criteria), I see evidence of this all over campus; though research shows otherwise. Interesting point, people are born with the ability to communicate non-verbally (NV) but most do not control nonverbal cues. However, NV’s are so important to communication thus replaced with symbols during texting in order to exchange feelings normally visualized through body language. Also, Social Anxiety Disorder caused by texting (lack of) effecting drug usage; interesting possibility. Likewise inference, we do not create our own world, therefore we are not in control of our forms of communication; curious. For the record, I agree we would be wise NOT to text and drive!
Once again I would like to express a warm thank you for your time and thoughts and I hope I covered the essence of our discussion in my closing statement

Ciao / Nicholas

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  • Oct 22 2012: Interesting perspectives, I hadn’t considered a correlation drugs and texting, however the prescribed remedy for anxiety commonly comes in pill form (legal rout); curious?

    I too suffered from a form of Anxiety, Separation Anxiety. I turned my phone off recently for academic reasons (I find it funny I had to explain why my phone was turned off, another discussion perhaps) The point is, for little less than a week I suffered from not having my phone. I would constantly reach for my phone, even if I didn’t need it, and I knew I did not have it. Little by little I would reduce the amount of times I reached for my phone until little less than a week later I stopped doing so. It was as I imagine weaning off of a dependency would be

    It is true we humans communicate using a variety of channels besides text-messages, though we remove two necessary channels when using text messages. No sound, we have been identifying communication with sound since birth, and now we remove it. Also, are visual cues not crucial to communicating efficiently with one another? Some people say, “We use symbols and capitulation to express visual cues.” To this I say yes we do, however are those enough to replace the volume of Non-Verbal communication one experiences in face to face interaction?

    I find our youth gain access to technology (phones) early on nowadays, children as young as 9 and suspect younger. Also, it is interesting how text-messaging is increasing expediential in a relatively short amount of time (early 90’s to Now). Personal communicators are here to stay; I do not see trends slowing down.

    Has anyone noticed how many people walk around glued to their phone, giving off a message to not bother them, they are busy; ergo avoidance. Aforementioned, my phone separation anxiety experience (dependency), more people in their phones, less face to face interacting and less use of skills previously mentioned, thus diminishing necessary skills for non-technological comm

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