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Should the global open-source community overthrow dysfunctional governments?

Why can't we have the United States of the Open-Source Community?
Why can't we empower those who are capable and willing to open-source their expertise to governments who are in short supply of the talents needed to be effective and efficient. Why can't we ship a hundred million people to a place in need temporarily to teach, create useful infrastructure etc etc. Why must sovereignty cause the lives of so many people who have yet the opportunity to grasp the concept of it?

Year in and year out, governments and banks write off billions and billions of dollars in bad debt, why can't we loan ourselves the necessary monetary resources to educate better citizens, build more effective and efficient infrastructures. Sure some will say, but how will that affect the economy? Can't we turn off the stock markets and make it work for us instead of against us? Sure, the real fear is that whatever everyone owns will probably lose value? But isn't that what we should be asking ourselves? What if we can appease those who fear that their money will no longer give them power? Is it our fault that we led them to think they had power in the first place?

I believe that we have all the tools we need to make a better tomorrow, just that we also have systems in place that stop us from using them. The steak that I love so much will taste the same or even better if I knew that no one is dying of hunger around the world. Billions of tons of food go to waste each year because we can't work ourselves around a system of commerce that dictates food needs to be bought, that profit needs to be made. If one is unemployed then one has no purchasing power. Perhaps if we change the meaning of employment and profits, then more people will be empowered to purchase goods and services, doesn't that mean more business for everyone? We have scaffolding in Education, why can't we have scaffolding for everything? Let's open-source the world and perhaps, we can wipe out the nonsense that we call poverty.

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  • Oct 15 2012: There is a reason why we have republics instead of democracy. Democracy is rule by the mob and it is unhealthy and does not work. As has been shown in the last 40 years revolutions rarely end well for thos who do the revolting. If they succeed in overthrowing the government with the intent of installing democracy they create a power vacuum which is usually filled by the most organized best armed groups. These groups usually start off by getting rid of the secular intelligencia that started the revolution in the first place.

    There is more to unravel in your question than this one area, but do not underestimate the general public's need for stability and security.
    • Oct 15 2012: What about a smarter and more organised mob? And I guess it all really depends on the criteria for what a dysfunctional government is. What would an open source community look like? What means can be undertaken to overthrow a governnent? Isn't there something wrong with the idea of a government regime?
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        Oct 16 2012: Yes, there is something fundamentally wrong with an all-powerful governmental regime. But our cultures are fear-based and this is indoctrinated into us. (Some escape)

        Fear-owned people want others to protect them. They see themselves as potential victims. They hide from knowledge and self-awareness.

        In the USA, 40% are said to believe in the faith of creationism as opposed to the theory of evolution. How can we trust a government that includes so many willfully ignorant people who want to use government power to force their ignorance on the rest of us?

        Wipe out ignorance and you can wipe out poverty. There really is a way.
        • Oct 16 2012: "Wipe out ignorance and you can wipe out poverty. There really is a way."

          Uhm no. The world is way more complicated then that.
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      Oct 17 2012: I agree with Sharon that rule by mob doesn't work. It all looks easier from the outside than from the inside.

      I also believe that some people overvalue expertise and learning but many more in modern culture undervalue them. Those who think they know better often don't, and confidence and boisterousness do not measure actual competence.

      I don't think the problems in our world come from governments having a short supply of talent - from not having access to or even employing smart and insightful people. They do bring in excellent and commited people.

      Could it be that problems are more challenging than they may appear on their surface? I think it is a fruitful habit when it looks like someone is incompetent or corrupt (because a problem has remained unsolved or because a person has tried something that did not work as hoped) to consider whether there is also an alternative interpretation.