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Connecting the Dots for a Better World

In a high-tech world, where automation is liberating us from monotonous and often painful jobs and labor and at the same time is providing abundance, one must begin to question and rethink how we could and should conduct ourselves here on Earth and what really matters.

A study done by World Hunger Education Service Associates reveals that our world produces enough food to feed everyone, but that the principal problem is that many people in the world do not have sufficient land to grow, or income to purchase, enough food. http://www.worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm

A MIT report shows that we have 4000 years of untapped clean and renewable geothermal energy that can easily meet the energy needs of tomorrow. http://geothermal.inel.gov/publications/future_of_geothermal_energy.pdf On top of that we have solar, wind, wave, tidal and piezoelectric energy sources as well.

So, instead of counting money (as we do today), which has no relevance to the physical world, what if we focused on counting the balance of Earth’s resources? By applying the scientific method for decision-making thus social concern and thus intelligently manage and allocate our finite natural resources based on the carrying capacity of Earth, we could easily create a sustainable planet keeping abundance high, eliminating poverty, decreasing nearly all crimes and violence as a result of eliminating poverty, and move innovation beyond traditional employment thus increasing our quality of life at an exponential rate.

OK, but how could one possibly be able to count and track Earth's resources at any given time maintaining a high abundance for all? Let's visualize it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=fSxIT3LixaE

The laws of nature, the way I see it, is the only real true government and regulatory system that has or will ever exist.

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  • Oct 13 2012: Mats, I read your original post and I agree with the assertion that the earth has ample resources currently to provide for all. It seems there are some small, isolated examples of groups of humans living within this type of pattern, all of which are indigenous people living as they have for centuries. We live in a technologically advanced 'Western' culture. We clearly cannot and would not want to go backwards to a primitive culture and forget the positives aspects to our technological progress of the past, so we need to answer, how do we move forward. I hope we start to see more open discussions like those going on here on TED and elsewhere on the internet, about possible new directions, and put those to the test in medium to large scale experiments with appropriate financial and popular support. Some groups have already started, for instance I've recently heard of "The Atlas Initiative", but it seems the project has been suffering from a lack of financial support.
    • Oct 14 2012: "We live in a technologically advanced 'Western' culture. We clearly cannot and would not want to go backwards to a primitive culture and forget the positives aspects to our technological progress of the past, so we need to answer, how do we move forward."

      Oh, absolutely. We would utilize technology to our highest advantage and automate jobs and labor we do not want anymore. Technology is the true liberator that frees us to focus on whats important, whatever that may be. It's not technology that needs to vanish, it's our current mindset. We need to evolve with technology. Technology provides abundance, but our values are hundreds of years old. So the question becomes: "What really matters?"

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