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James Zediana

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Where did we come from?

I started several debates in TED and results are evolution can't be proven. SHORT OF CREATION and EVOLUTION is there another option?

I believe this is a fundamental question to be answered.

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  • Oct 10 2012: Has anybody heard the name of the co-discoverer of natural selection ?
    Alfred Russel Wallace ; initially the theory of evolution was called Darwin-Wallace theory .
    Historians of science have noted that, while Darwin considered the ideas in Wallace's paper to be essentially the same as his own, there were differences.
    " Wallace had "probably said the most powerful thing that’d been said in the 19th Century :
    A Necessary Unity...."
    Wallace :
    "The action of this principle is exactly like that of the centrifugal governor of the steam engine, which checks and corrects any irregularities almost before they become evident .."

    "Wallace was strongly attracted to unconventional ideas. His advocacy of Spiritualism and his belief in a non-material origin for the higher mental faculties of humans strained his relationship with the scientific establishment, especially with other early proponents of evolution."

    Interesting....
    If anybody is interested , let Google help you and share your findings , please :)
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      Oct 10 2012: Hi Natasha!

      Wallace is believed by some to have brought the idea of evolution to the mind of Darwin.
      For certain it wasn't his idea only but Darwin sure was the one that brought it to the attention of the public at large.

      Jean Baptiste Lamarck had similar ideas that are becoming more prominent now with the discovery of epigenetics, the way environmental changes influence genetic expression.
      • Oct 10 2012: Hi, Frans !!!
        Wallace didn't bring the idea to the mind of Darwin, he sent him the paper by post :)
        Darwin received the manuscript from Wallace. Assay "On the Tendency of Varieties to Depart Indefinitely From the Original Type", and Darwin commented : "he could not have made a better short abstract! Even his terms now stand as heads of my chapters ..."

        But it is not the point.

        "But the twin impulses in Wallace’s work make him compelling and oddly contemporary. He combines both halves of the debate over the meaning of evolution, coolly articulating the materialist mechanisms by which the simplest organisms morphed into human beings while arguing that our existence offers evidence of divine agency. "

        Check out here:

        http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/12/wallace/quammen-text

        It's interesting , really !

        Thank you very much for responding !
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          Oct 16 2012: Nice article Natasha, I just read it.
          Thank you!

          Walace placed the first hints at plate tectonics as well.
      • Oct 17 2012: Welcome ! :)
        Maybe you'll be interested in this article
        http://www.michaelhayes.net/articles7.html

        There is a sense in which Wallace idea of " the centrifugal governor of the steam
        engine " belongs here.
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      Oct 12 2012: Did some research on him and found that he believed that simple forms of life were created continuously by spontaneous generation.
      • Oct 16 2012: Maybe the Aristotle's idea of ' spontaneous generation' was not alien to Wallace, i don't know.
        But what he emphasized in his 'version' of natural selection was 'ecological interactions'. Some scientists go so far as to interpret Wallace's thinking as the first example of cybernetic modeling.
        And maybe it echoes somehow with Sheldrake's 'Morphic field' ?

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