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Warren Whitfield

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Is it right to profit from addiction? Is it right to profit from harm?

Is it right to profit from the sale of addictive products and services, specifically, from the portion of consumers who are addicted i.e. cannot control their consumption? Whilst morality is a subjective issue, the harm that is caused by this practice is measurable. Therefore is it right to profit from causing harm?

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  • Sep 24 2012: Most good things turn bad when misused; or when taken in excess. In some cases a product is addictive but it still has its benefitial uses when applied in appropraite measures. In such cases it may not be the intention of the producer or supplier to turn people to addicts.
    In some cases it could be important for such producers to have warnings of the package of such products.

    It is the responsibility of individuals to control their instincts, tastes, cravings and desires.
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      Sep 25 2012: Feyisayo, the do you understand addiction? People who are addicted cannot control themselves. And whilst they may have been responsible in using alcohol for instance, once addicted they can't control themselves. In South Africa, the so called warning on every alcoholic "beverage" is simply... Not for sale to persons under the age of 18 years old. Your argument is what alcohol manufacturers use to exclude themselves from any liability whatsoever. But does the so called warning on alcoholic beverages in South Africa "Not for sale to person's under the age of 18 years of age" - adequately warn people that... 1) Alcohol is a a drug. 2) The government recommended daily allowance of alcohol is 2 units per day for men and 1 unit per day for woman? 3) That drinking more than the government recommended daily allowance is considered misuse? 4) That misusing drugs can kill you? see http://www.ahrc.org.za

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