Kieran Sharp

snowboard coach, blue mile snowsports

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Can we change? can we live without money?

Ancient civilisations achieved a great deal, when focusing their efforts upon whichever problem needed to be solved. Energy, water, food etc.

Where previous civilisations failed to meet the needs of their people we now have the opportunity to learn from them and with greater numbers than has ever been on this planet before.

However we have been distracted for generations.

Our efforts are focussed on acquiring, chasing, and losing money, while real issues such as providing fresh drinking water, food, and energy to all humanity are ignored by the majority of us.

The problem with money has become so complex and yet its source energy is greed, and we know this to be destructive in all forms of relationship.

Why would we continue to face the world’s problems using the biggest source of distraction in humanity to get us there?

It is insanity to believe that we need “new world order” and world currency to solve these issues.

A thought:

Imagine everyone today who’s role in human civilisation is to protect and serve money (bankers, accountants, so on and so on) where to be suddenly un-employed.
What figure would that be?
How many working hours would there be available for other more productive tasks in society?

Imagine there is no money. What do we need? How much of it do we need?

Can we meet our needs as a civilisation with the quantities we require vs the amount of time and human energy we have?
Can we stand as ONE to achieve this?

There are more questions, there are more problems, change is coming one way or another, and time is running out.

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    Gail .

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    Sep 24 2012: I am a firm believer in the moneyless society, and I have great hope for mankind in our ability to get there. But a few more may have to wake up, but that's happening already. I think that time you speak of will be here sooner, rather than later. The current global economic model that you refer to is on the verge of collapse, and cannot be sustained much longer.

    Recently, a major city here in the US had a teacher's strike. Immediately, the communities got involved. Churches and children's clubs and community centers all opened their doors, and volunteers appeared to take care of the children whose parents were working. Left to their own devices, people will help people. But as soon as money comes into the picture, our neighbors might as well be our enemy.

    Because we live in a fear-based culture, it is unlikely that you will convince enough to stand up with you to achieve sanity. I sadly conclude that we have to let the economy fail, and hold firm in our faith in our ability to rise above the chaos and fear that will ensue. Then we, who are at peace within ourselves, not matter the outer situation, will be able to direct the sheeple to a more rewarding and life-affirming worldview where the few do not benefit at great cost to the many.
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    Sep 24 2012: If there is no need to make more money, then it is logical to assume the things we need will become higher quality and more durable. We won’t need to save money on creating with cheaper materials, and because they last they will rarely need replacing.
    If we don’t need to sell cheaper products because they don’t last then how many more humans will be out of employment?
    How many more working hours would there be available for other more productive tasks in society?


    By doing this eventually we will be wasting less so there will be more material available for creation. If there is less waste in the world, how many more humans will be out of employment?
    How many more working hours would there be available for other more productive tasks in society?


    If there is no money and the things you need can be created it is logical to assume that less crimes will be committed. In light of this how much less authority would we need?
    How many more working hours would there be available for other more productive tasks in society?