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Is Faith inherently irrational?

I would like to propose the motion that faith is inherently irrational.

I consider rationality (in a nutshell) to be:
'An accurate apportionment of belief in a statement concerning the objective nature of reality, with respect to the available evidence.'

I can think of no better definition of faith than the exact opposite of this:
'A grossly inaccurate apportionment of belief in a statement concerning the objective nature of reality, with respect to the available evidence.'

However, I invite those who have faith, and profess it as a virtue, to submit their definition of faith.

(EDIT 16/9/12: This is intended to be a discussion on the nature of religious faith, of the sort people cite when putting forward claims of the supernatural, of gods, of an afterlife etc.... This is not intended to be a discussion of the wider concepts of hope, loyalty, trust or monogamy, but feel free to mention them in passing, or in comparison to faith. ENDEDIT).

Joseph Dorrell

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  • Sep 15 2012: Faith consists in making oneself believe, through the power of one's own reason OR intuition to undertake a worthy and challenging task that common sense/social reason says is impossible. Faith is against all odds, just as existence is against all odds - therefore is entirely individual and solitary, and yet is meaningful only in action. Just 'having faith' without it being put to test is useless and meaningless. Ultimately, faith in the strongest terms is tested in life and death situations where one's entire being and the values one holds to be absolute are at stake.
    AS an example of what I mean study the dialogs of Plato about the trial and death of Socrates.

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