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Ayd Asraf

Corporate Senior IT Executive - Release Team, Aramex International

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Since we are in 2012, do you think that we really done with African-Americans and other minorities discrimination ?

In a day like Today, Precisely on September 9, 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1957. Originally proposed by Attorney General Herbert Brownell, the Act marked the first occasion since Reconstruction that the federal government undertook significant legislative action to protect civil rights. Although influential southern congressman whittled down the bill?s initial scope, it still included a number of important provisions for the protection of voting rights. It established the Civil Rights Division in the Justice Department, and empowered federal officials to prosecute individuals that conspired to deny or abridge another citizen's right to vote. Moreover, it also created a six-member U.S. Civil Rights Commission charged with investigating allegations of voter infringement. But, perhaps most importantly, the Civil Rights Act of 1957 signaled a growing federal commitment to the cause of civil rights.It was the first of several civil rights acts over the next several decades to protect the rights of African-Americans and other minorities. VOA's Deborah Block has details. After 55 years from this do you think that we really done with African-Americans and other minorities discrimination ?

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    Sep 9 2012: I think Feyisayo offers a wise and excellent reply. Laws do not erase people's prejudices toward or misconceptions about others based on ethnicity, religion, age, gender and so forth.

    As Feyisayo writes: What is important is that a society makes its stand known on this issues; and the constitution of the United States is clear on the issue of human rights and justice.
    Words alone don't constitute a stand. Continuing work to get more right and less wrong is another piece of the answer.

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