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Ayd Asraf

Corporate Senior IT Executive - Release Team, Aramex International

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Since we are in 2012, do you think that we really done with African-Americans and other minorities discrimination ?

In a day like Today, Precisely on September 9, 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1957. Originally proposed by Attorney General Herbert Brownell, the Act marked the first occasion since Reconstruction that the federal government undertook significant legislative action to protect civil rights. Although influential southern congressman whittled down the bill?s initial scope, it still included a number of important provisions for the protection of voting rights. It established the Civil Rights Division in the Justice Department, and empowered federal officials to prosecute individuals that conspired to deny or abridge another citizen's right to vote. Moreover, it also created a six-member U.S. Civil Rights Commission charged with investigating allegations of voter infringement. But, perhaps most importantly, the Civil Rights Act of 1957 signaled a growing federal commitment to the cause of civil rights.It was the first of several civil rights acts over the next several decades to protect the rights of African-Americans and other minorities. VOA's Deborah Block has details. After 55 years from this do you think that we really done with African-Americans and other minorities discrimination ?

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  • Sep 9 2012: We need to strive for a society that protects minority rights; and a society that does not relent in its fight against injustice. There can be no perfect society. But we have to do our best. I think the United States is on the right path as far as minority rights is concerned.
    One important thing to note is that laws can not eradicate injustice and discrimination and racism. There are laws against murder, rape,corruption and other societal ills; but laws can not end such evils because freedom means the possibility of making the wrong choice. There will always be those people who will harm others with their freedom.
    What is important is that a society makes its stand known on this issues; and the constitution of the United States is clear on the issue of human rights and justice.

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