TED Conversations

TED Book Chat

This conversation is closed. Start a new conversation
or join one »

Discussing "The Science of Radical Life Extension" with TED Books author David Ewing Duncan

Continuing with our series of TED Book Chats.... How long do you want to live, and why?

For the next two weeks, we'll be discussing David Ewing Duncan's new eBook, "When I'm 164", on the science of radical life extension. Duncan surveys the increasingly legitimate science — from genetics and regeneration to machine solutions — and considers the pluses and minuses of living to age 164, or beyond. We'll look at everything from the impact of extended life on cities, services, and the cost of living as well as what happens to love, curiosity, and general health.

The book is available for Kindle, Nook, and iOS devices (which have a great new custom TED Books app):

Kindle copy: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008XB16ME/
iOS app: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ted-books/id511071050?mt=8

The New York Times also published an excerpt this week, you can read it here: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/26/sunday-review/how-long-do-you-want-to-live.html

Finally, author David Ewing Duncan will be joining us for a live Q&A at 4pm EDT on September 11th!

Looking forward to our discussion!

+1
Share:

Showing single comment thread. View the full conversation.

  • thumb
    Sep 11 2012: Do you ever study old photos? Did physical aging look any different 100 years ago than it does today?

    Would a 60 year old in 1912 have looked as old as an 80 year old today?
    • thumb
      Sep 11 2012: I asked my 81 year-old dad this, and he thinks people did look older at an earlier age when he was young. In my family we have many pix from the late 19th century, etc., and some of the people look old and worn out even in their 30s and 40s, though most looked their age - my family, though, tends to live a long time, so we may be different. An interesting question!
      • thumb
        Sep 11 2012: I'd imagine it would be difficult to put together, but I'd love to see a table of photos comparing people at various ages 100 years ago and now. Has anyone done this?

Showing single comment thread. View the full conversation.