TED Conversations

José Carlos Pons

WWF Mexico

This conversation is closed.

Wouldn't happiness bring about professional and personal stagnation?

I have not met a human being who does not want to be happy. However, following the argument brought forward by Shawn Anchor, unhappiness is the main driver for continuous personal and professional development, i.e. we are never satisfied with what we have.
In this scenario, would't happiness bring about professional and personal stagnation.

Share:

Showing single comment thread. View the full conversation.

  • Aug 28 2012: José, I'm having difficulty with your interpretation of Shawn Anchor's argument, which is actually the foundation for the question you posed here (and this entire thread). Let me explain:

    You say that "however, following the argument brought forward by Shawn Anchor, unhappiness is the main driver for continuous personal and professional development"... The problem I have with this is: When exactly does Shawn Anchor say (or imply) that "unhappiness is the main driver for continuous personal and professional development" ?

    I don't think he ever does.

    I've watched the video 4 times, trying to glean this as either verbatim or implied, and I am not deducing your interpretation of Shawn Anchor's argument from what he actually said/implied.

    Go back to 9:04 in the video, and carefully listen again to what he says.

    I think you've got your cause and effect mixed up. I don't think he's saying that unhappiness causes the drive for personal and professional achievement. I believe what Shawn Anchor is actually saying, is that the human mind turns our results from achieving personal/professional development into unhappiness because we keep changing the goal posts "of what success looks like". Watch and listen again starting at 9:04 if you're still not convinced.

    After watching that again, I think you will agree that he is not saying that unhappiness is the driver for personal/professional development, what he's saying is that we as humans have been conditioned to turn our successes into unhappiness.

    And if my analysis of your (mis)interpretation is correct, then that would make this whole thread a moot point, but not one without value, as apparently there are many other people here who mistakenly assumed your interpretation of Shawn Anchor's argument was on point.

Showing single comment thread. View the full conversation.