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I cannot decide what to do in my life... Help please...

Please look at this link to see my other question, no need to answer it, just look at the first paragraph, and come back...
http://www.ted.com/conversations/12859/i_want_to_become_a_theoretical.html
Well, i am facing some problems, i want to become a physicist, probably particle or theoretical physicist... (I am 14 years old)
But i cannot decide, as i face some problems...
1. Physics interests me a lot, like really a lot, but i want to live a comfortable life...
2. I do not seek money, i seek the passion and love of science. (apparently my parents do.)
3. I cannot decide what to do, i am confused, even though i love physics more than anything, my parents would much rather want me to live a rather simple life, and settle my life first, and then chase such what they call "irrational dreams".

I completely understand why they are soo concerned, but i am still not content, i love science, but then i want to parents to be sure that my future is certain, as i do not come from a rich family, as i may put it...

I may become an exceptionally famous scientist, or an unrecognized scientist which to some people never lived...
I do not want to upset my parents by taking such a risky and as i may put it, 'weird job'. Even though i love it... Please put some light on my situation and what possible options i have, and how i should be clever in choosing them... Do not forget to read the question on top, as it will help in better comprehension of my situation...

Thank you for your considerate time, energy and efforts to solve my personal problems!

  • Jul 30 2012: Yash,

    I am a university professor and can tell you first hand that physics professors, at least in the US, are highly valued and make enough money to live comfortable lives. And of course, the better the work of the physicist, the more highly paid and well regarded he or she is. Follow your passion and see where it takes you. I agree with those who tell you to remain flexible; life unfolds in unexpected ways and one does need to be alert for signs and signals along the road that can lead you to the next place. Maybe your love of physics will blossom into something else. But do what you love and be yourself. Work hard and see what happens. The rest will come with time.

    Good luck.
    • Aug 25 2012: Thank you! and Hello :P
      I feel kind of lost, and i need a bit of guidance.
      I would be nothing but grateful if you could add me on facebook so that we can have a friendly science-career based conversation online.
      Thank you for your time.
      P.S. My facebook id: akhauri.yash@gmail.com
      Link to my account: http://www.facebook.com/akhauri.yash
      Thank you (No pressure on adding me :|)
  • Jul 29 2012: I recommend you to watch the TED talk named 'Advice to young scientists' which will shed some light upon your mathematical puzzle.
  • Aug 8 2012: Have you seen Larry Smith's talk, Why you will fail to have a great career? I believe everyone is on earth for a purpose, which is indicated by his passion. It sounds like yours is physics. It's not easy to follow your purpose. Among other things, you have to face the objections of people who love you, such as your parents who want to protect you. But parents usually change their minds once they see that their son or daughter is serious about his or her passion. Again, because they love you. So, good luck, follow your passion and have a greatly adventurous life.
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    Jul 29 2012: Yash,

    This is a very important time that everyone goes through. I am seventeen and have just gone through the entire process. The main thing you need to do is believe. Believe no matter what you choose you will be happy, believe that you can go as far as you want to go and most of all believe in yourself.

    Once you believe then you can start making a constructive path. Here are a couple pointers:

    - If there is something you like (in this case physics) then follow it. But, remember to go in with little expectations and be willing to be flexible. Your world can change on a dime and you need to be able to constructively change with it.

    - The hardest thing you will ever face is getting up after a failure. Failure is not a means to an end, it is the greatest leason you can learn. So, even if you fall flat on your face, get up and keep going.

    - The last thing to do is to have fun. This is suppose to be your passion! Live is short, so you better enjoy it while you still can. If you find you really do not like what you are doing, drop it and look for something else; you are still young, these major changes are suppose to happen. Personally I changed what I wanted to be eight or nine times before I made my decision.

    I wish you all the best!
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    Jul 29 2012: Hello Yash. I am only 7 years your senior, and still remember thinking about issues like this when I was 14. This is a question you will probably still be struggling with when you are 21, but I think the best way I can answer this question is to give you a brief overview of my story.

    When I was a young kid, I wanted to be either a doctor or a lawyer. That was sort of the definition of "success" that had been impressed upon me. In school, I found that I loved math and science, but I wasn't really sure what to do with them. At age 14, I knew that I wanted to be an architect. At age 15, I knew that I did not want to be an architect (it turns out that the actuality of being an architect was much different than what I thought it would be). I then thought I wanted to be a research scientist, most likely in chemistry or materials science. I went to an engineering school intending to focus on materials science. I am now going to graduate in a year with a B.Sc. in electrical and computer engineering. Who knows what will happen next?

    Life will present to you many new opportunities in the future that are not yet visible. I say pursue your interest in physics, but be open to other possibilities that you find interesting. I do not think your dreams are irrational. However, I would express to you that there are many considerations in life besides how passionate you are about your work. For instance, my dad did not follow his passions, as he would not have been able to be financially secure with a family. He consciously chose a different path that would offer other benefits that he considered to be more important in the long run. I do not intend to downplay the importance of passion, but there are other considerations.

    It's very difficult to project your life many years into the future. As long as you are conscious of your goals, I think you will end up with something you find fulfilling.
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    Jul 29 2012: Pretend you wanna be an engineer, and then keep going into doing research.
  • Aug 25 2012: First of all, do what makes you happy in life. There is no point doing something which will bring you no satisfaction. As you are anticipating, the journey will be difficult. All the more reason to work diligently. Just remember that you are more than capable. That being said, do not let yourself get too high or low in your confidence, stay level and focused no matter your current situation whether good or bad. Take the advice from the people which you are asking, but remember that it is up to you to deem it fit or unfit for your use, including this piece of advice.

    I am a theoretical physics major in Canada. I also play varsity basketball which is time consuming. I am succeeding in my program as of yet. I did not know as much about Physics at age 14 that you seem to know. I am doing fine so, by comparison, you should be just fine.

    Keep happy, keep confident, keep focused, keep working and keep taking all, and using some, advice.
    • Aug 25 2012: Hello.
      I am very pleased to know that you successfully chased your dreams and got what you loved.
      I feel kind of lost, and i need a bit of guidance. I always wanted to talk to a scientist, as i believe that they can guide me the best.
      I would be nothing but grateful if you could add me on facebook so that we can have a friendly science-career based conversation online.
      Thank you for your time.
      P.S. My facebook id: akhauri.yash@gmail.com
      Link to my account: http://www.facebook.com/akhauri.yash
      Thank you (No pressure on adding me :|)
  • Aug 16 2012: Hi Yash. I am a scientist and I love it. It is not really that hard to do. You require perseverance and responsibility, and it can take you very far. My parents also wanted me to study management, to earn a lot of money. I hated the idea. Being in a class that you have no interest in is terrible. Chances are that you won't perform very well. Fortunately their plans of me studying management were frustrated (as I did not get an scholarship), and studied Chemistry instead, in a state (free in Latin America) university. I spend 6 years there and I loved every minute of that. I also studied astronomy as an amateur. Later on I obtained a government scholarship and came to study my doctorate in physics and biology in England. It is undoubtedly a job that requires passion. I work part time as a teacher and I earn enough money to live well. As a scientist you have the chance to travel the world (for free, if you go to conferences). I am not a notable scientist (yet!) but I do not thing I have wasted my life. Parents have sometimes temporary (albeit strong) beliefs. You should do what your heart tells you and they'll accept it eventually. Good luck!
    • Aug 25 2012: Hello.
      I am very pleased to know that you successfully chased your dreams and got what you loved.
      I feel kind of lost, and i need a bit of guidance. I always wanted to talk to a scientist, as i believe that they can guide me the best.
      I would be nothing but grateful if you could add me on facebook so that we can have a friendly science-career based conversation online.
      Thank you for your time.
      P.S. My facebook id: akhauri.yash@gmail.com
      Link to my account: http://www.facebook.com/akhauri.yash
      Thank you (No pressure on adding me :|)
  • Aug 2 2012: Feel what you want to do and then move the guilt around doing it.
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    Jul 30 2012: I suggest It's not irrational to want to be a scientist. You can make a good living.

    Science can also lead to living and working overseas.

    Even if your focus changes, a science degree is a good start.

    I've worked for both government and private research enterprises, but ended up in a more business, marketing, management, strategic role.

    It's your life. I understand many cultures have more parental influence and respect for their wishes than mine.

    Will you regret following your dream more than discomfort from the initial parents response. Don't limit your horizons. They have your interests at heart, but it is a much more mobile world.
  • Jul 30 2012: Just do what you love and don't worry about your future.You must be brave to realize your dream.
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    Jul 29 2012: Do what you love, love what you do, and everything will work out.
  • Jul 29 2012: Engineering.
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    Jul 29 2012: Perhaps the best advice for you is to get exposed to different fields. If you are indecisive, then test the waters. Find out if there's anything else you really like or if there's only one thing you like.

    I was very interested in conceptual physics when I was in middle school as well. I thought black holes and stars and supernovas were the coolest things. However, my parents told me, it's too hard, you don't want to do it. My parents were both majors of physics at one point and thought Physics was the best subject ever. But once they got into it, they realized it was way over their heads. So they aren't just telling me not to do it, they're telling me with experience. As a college student, I'm now into programming, and looking back, I would definitely not have been a good physicist, even a theoretical one, and it really was way over my head lol.

    Basically, just explore other options before you really commit to something prematurely. I still like conceptual physics myself, but it's more of a hobby than a profession.

    And I also just want to clarify, that if you find that you really do like physics, then just go for it. You really can do anything if you have the passion for it.
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    Jul 29 2012: Physics, and particle physics in particular, are fascinating fields with a lot of path-breaking activity happening right now.

    You are only fourteen and do not need to have your life planned yet. My advice to any young person (and my son is your age) is to take the courses and expend the energy to lay a foundation for a range of options in the future.

    Math and science are useful in addition to intriguing to you and can form a basis for physics, for engineering, for medical fields... and financial assistance for university will be available.
    • Aug 25 2012: Thank you for your time. I really appreciate your honest reply :)