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Why is the lifelong goal for so many to be fat and lazy?

I always hear the word retirement. TV, news, work, school, etc.

Anecdotally, I know people who take retirement to contribute back to society in a way they could have never done before. They make retirement a joy to behold in how they enrich their lives as well as the lives of others. They make up less than 10% of the people I know.

The rest? 12 hours of TV a day, eating out, and maybe travel a bit to eat out somewhere else. They may also get involved in some community project who's main purpose isn't to enrich the community but to make the 12 hours of R&R into 13 hours of R&R by making all the young kids do all the work for them.

If they aren't retired, I talked to enough people to find out that the above is their goal in life.

Why is this? Why is the lifelong goal for so many people to be fat, lazy, and doing absolutely nothing?

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  • Jul 28 2012: You'd be an odd duck if your lifelong goal were to be fat and lazy. Also, doing absolutely nothing once in a while may not be such a bad goal for people in busy, stressful environments common today. It doesn't have to be denoted as a negative thing necessarily, consider it meditation.

    Perhaps a lot of people look at it in the sense that they've been working so hard their whole lives that it would be nice to do nothing for a while, which could lead to being lazy. Laziness, of course, leads to being overweight.

    Depending on the circumstances it's possible that some people are simply burnt out and don't feel they have the energy to do anything else. Though I'm sure they may have pictured the outcome of their lives to be different, who's to say.

    I feel people are like this even off the subject of retirement. Those that do, and those that do not. The problem is that a lot of people don't realize their true potential and/or lack self motivation.

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