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Michael Klugemischa137@cox.net

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If the universe is expanding - what is it expanding into?

what is THAT space called
and why isn't it part of the universe now?

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    Jul 20 2012: At this moment(At least this is what I believe) our universe is pushing on the edges of other universes. These universe may have different laws of physics and may lie in a different dimensional state, so are universe can't expand into it because of these fundamental differences or, in simpler terms, they aren't the fitting puzzle pieces so they can't come together. So, are universe can't go into THAT space, it's just expanding it's own space. Eventually, all the galaxy's will be so far apart, you won't be able to see other ones(except Andromeda which is on a collision coarse with the Milky Way).
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      Jul 20 2012: Do you have a time frame on that collision with Andromeda? I've got plans.
      • Jul 20 2012: Don't worry, Edward, the 'collision' will not interfere with your plans unless your plans extend for billions of years. The collision of galaxies is actually a merger rather than a collision. I think scientists like to use the word collision because it is more dramatic and gets more attention. I suppose they feel neglected.
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          Jul 20 2012: Cool! I'm ok then. Back in the 40's Hubble said the universe was 2 billion years old. Now the number is 14+ billion years. The Standard Model seems sketchy in places so I am not going to put a lot of stock in the predicted galactic merger 4 billion years upstream. Thanks Barry!
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          Jul 22 2012: Time for a coffee then.
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        Jul 20 2012: Yeah, the merger isn't estimated to occur for another 4 billion years.
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          Jul 20 2012: OK Kevin, I'm over sweating about the coming galactic collision. But now I have a new concern, if the universe is 14+billion years old why are there no single-field galaxies? Why are all known galaxies clumped together in clusters? After billions of years of expanding shouldn’t galaxies have become detached and isolated from one another?--Edward
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        Jul 20 2012: Gravity Edward, though even though they may appear close together in most clusters they're still extremely far apart. And is Andromeda part of a cluster? Surely most of the deep field galaxies in the hubble photos are single fielded.
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          Jul 21 2012: Yeah, that pretty much sum's it up.
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          Jul 21 2012: You say "surely most of the deep field etc." glibly Kevin. Let's just talk confirmed data ( Messier objects) for now.
        • Jul 24 2012: FYI Andromeda is part of our local cluster, along with the Milky Way and a bunch of smaller galaxies.
      • Jul 26 2012: " Back in the 40's Hubble said the universe was 2 billion years old. Now the number is 14+ billion years."


        Hubble's math was right, his idea was right, and his data was right, but his plot wrong because he did not have a "standard candle". Today astronomers have been able to set standard candles with supernova, which is how we now know why Hubble was wrong and also why the current numbers are much more accurate.
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          Jul 26 2012: Thaks for the explanation. Perhaps tomorrow's numbers will be even more accurate, which is why it would be a mistake to think that we now know enough to fully explain the origin, operation, and fate of the Universe.
      • Jul 26 2012: Very true, one day we may know the numbers right down to the nearest second. One neat thing about Hubble's experiment was even at the time it was well known that the earth was older than that, so Hubble got quite a lot of grief. But today the principle is known as "Hubble's Law" :-)

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