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List 5 books that you consider must-reads

I would like you to list those books that made a better you or those that you find very meaningful for some reason, inspiring, jaw-dropping. Those sorts of books that made you feel sad when you ended reading them or those which you'd re-read.

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    Jul 9 2012: 1) Deadly spin
    2) Grapes of Wrath
    3) Better Angel of our natures
    4) Bible (whehter religious or not it is fundamental to western society
    5)) Freakenomics.
  • Jul 13 2012: 1. Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space by Carl Sagan
    2. The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark by Carl Sagan (He was so passionate about science)
    3. A Brief History of Time and/or A Briefer History of Time by Stephen Hawking (very interesting/thought provoking)
    4. Shit My Dad Says by Justin Halpern (actually quite heartwarming)
    5. Any of the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy series by Douglas Adams (This man had an amazing imagination, and his books deliver some great satire)

    The first 3 I've always loved because I find science and the cosmos infinitely interesting, and love to learn about that kind of stuff. The last 2 I think are just really entertaining.
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    Jul 11 2012: Recent reads
    1. Wonder by RJPalacio
    2. Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine
    3. The New Earth by Eckhart Tolle
    4. Last Seen in Lhasa by Claire Scobie
    5. The Art of Mindfulness by Thich Nhat Hanh
  • Jul 11 2012: ......................................
    1_ (HOLLY QURA`AN)
    2_(N L P )
    3-(SEVEN HABBITS FOR HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLE)
    4_(LONG WALK TO FREEDOM )
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      Jul 9 2012: i personally suggest you read everything Ayn Rand wrote. She will convince you with her rhetoric that she is an empty people hating person, in my opinion. I do think the other books are worthwhile but I would flush Atas down the first toilet.
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          Jul 10 2012: Edwin, when I said the I have read every word SHE wrote. I meant it. I did not read second hand sources until much later. I have even listened to philosphical tapes about her philospohpy. I lived down the road from the Rand estate for years.
          I have made a point of studying her philosophies and all of her writings.
          I can't stand her.YUCK!
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          Jul 10 2012: Edwin, would you prime the pump by sharing yours, please?

          I would have to start with maybe Ghandi and Mandela who are not normally considered such and I do not want to confuse or distort your question as i have not got a degree in philosphy.
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          Jul 10 2012: Reading is a great way to walk in someone else's shoes no matter who is doing the writing. So, Edwin did you ever consider writing one?
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          Jul 11 2012: Hi Edwin, I do not know as I have never tried. Writing theses was hard enough for me and I always believed that I would not write a book until I had something unique to say. I hope you will try though. Somewhere along the road I read something that talked about all the things you should do in a lifetime. I forget just what it said beyond planting a tree (done many times over) and writing a book. This might be the only thing undone except for finding the love of my life and that is stil a distinct possibility I am happy to report. I am very certain it said nothing about having a stroke but MAN did I learn alot. Celebrate with me Edwin - yesterday I saw a doctor, an expert in strokes and he said that he felt i was one of the rare people who will make a full recovery. I want that more than I can even express!
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          Jul 11 2012: Hi Edwin, The weird thing was that I was not a candidate for a stroke and at 56 I just went in for a surgery and they did not tell me that this was even a possibility. I lost confidence, all of my balance, intially I was in a coma for more than 2 weeks, I am told, I lost the ability to walk and talk and most of the coordination in my left hand (I have been typing answers on TED to improve my use of this hand in particular.) I still have balance problems but I look quite normal now most of the time but as you might imagine I got very thin after vomiting 10-13 times a day for more than 3 months. I lost a lot of confidence as well and that in itself is surprisingly dibilitating.
          I never did lose my will to live and to love.
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          Jul 11 2012: Edwin, that question could be directed to Collen or Tim or Edward but I am Canadian and I do not pay (except through employer or taxes for my healthcare. Can you imagine what that spinal surgery, 2 weeks in a coma, 4.5 months in a rehab hospital and 2 months of outpatient treatment would have cost me in the US? I would most certainly be bankrupt! I have other concerns because of my health but it is not about how I will pay bills.
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          Jul 11 2012: Edwin and Debra,
          Prior to being eligible for Medicare, I paid $700.00 per month for a single person health care package. At a certain age, I was eligible for medicare coverage....THANKFULLY!!!

          The thing that gets me about the high expense, is that I'm a very healthy person, use and need very little in the way of health care.

          However, one has to have coverage for the unexpected! The hospital cost for my head injury/surgery 22 years ago was well over $300,000.00....100% covered by insurance. So if something like that happens to us, and we do not have insurance coverage, we can be financially cleaned out! This is a little off topic, but you DID ask, and bring me into the conversation:>)

          On topic...
          I read a TON of books while recovering from the head injury, craniotomy and cancer surgery...all around the same time. I read books about people who faced UNBELIEVABLE life challenges, which made my challenges seem less challenging. I kept thinking...well...if they can do THAT, I can certainly deal with my "stuff":>)
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    Jul 9 2012: 1. The Bible

    2. '1984' by George Orwell

    3. 'Long Walk to Freedom' by Nelson Mandela

    4. 'The Complete C.S.Lewis Signature Classics' by C.S. Lewis

    5. 'The Alchemist' by Paulo Coelho
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      Jul 9 2012: Love your list and I have read them all. I loved the long walk to freedom and 4 and 5 too
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        Jul 9 2012: I have read 'Grapes of Wrath' on your list. John Steinbeck is one of my favourite writers.
        But the writings C.S. Lewis and Nelson Mandela has the greatest influence on me. I'm happy that you have read C.S.Lewis.
        Will you like to share your thoughts on his works?
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          Jul 9 2012: CS Lewis is one of my all time favourites for clarity of thought, compassion and logic. One of my favourite thoughts from him goes something like this "We must never forget what it felt like not to know."
          I think of it all the time. He was a truly noble soul.
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        Jul 11 2012: “Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another: "What! You too? I thought I was the only one.”
        ― C.S. Lewis
        What? You like C.S. Lewis too!? I thought Feyisayo and I were the only ones.
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          Jul 11 2012: No, you are not the only ones and YES! I adore him. I have read all his books and letters, I think and I love his take on gender issues - O think he can be hillarious. Did you ever read his take on gender where he asks something like "if you accidently killed the neighbour's dog would you rather deal with the husband or the wife?" So right on!
          I love and adore the way he loved his wife. I love and adore his nobility as demonstrated by his adopting his friend's mother when his friend died in WW1.
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          Jul 11 2012: Dear Edward,. I wouldcovet and cherish your friendship. I was a bit overwhelmed by the offer of it so I did my normal hide until I can cope thing and I hsve returned to ensure that i sill have the opportunity.
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        Jul 11 2012: Hereafter please refer to me as, "my friend Edward." Since I am old, perhaps you can refer to me as, "my old friend Edward." Call me what you will my friend.- Grace and peace to you in abundance. Let us at once test the cords of friendship by considering Ayn Rand. If you could speak with her over tea what philosophy would you tell her you wish she had not promoted?
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          Jul 11 2012: Dear Friend Edward.
          I sincerely hope i do not meet Ayn over tea yet (|I am allergic to death right now) but I did live down the road from the Rand estate. We would discuss our responsibilty to our fellow man.
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      Jul 10 2012: Feyisayo Anjorin: I have read three out your five excluding Mandela and ""1984"

      If you are a parent or considering raising a life read "Parental Proverbs for Instructional Living"
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        Jul 10 2012: As a parent, my all time favourite was the 'dictionary of cultural literacy' by E.D. Hirsch. As I sometimes felt that i was parenting myself at the same time i was parenting my children - itprovided a guide line for me about what they needed to know to function in our society. i wanted to give them the very best chance in life that I could. I found it at the library/
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          Jul 11 2012: Hi Debra: Then you should consider "Parental Proverbs for Instructional Living" written by yours truly. Very comprehensive, provocative and proactive. Or you can check my website for a sneak preview www.oliversparentingproverbs.com

          Will check out Hirsch book.
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        Jul 11 2012: Hi Oliver! Although the youngest of my five is now 21, I will check out your book with pleasure! Thanks for letting me know about it. Did you write it as part of a thesis?
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        Jul 11 2012: Please clarify what your phrase "raising a life" means. Thank you!
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    Jul 9 2012: 1. The Bible

    2. '1984' by George Orwell

    3. 'Long Walk to Freedom' by Nelson Mandela

    4. 'The Complete C.S.Lewis Signature Classics' by C.S. Lewis

    5. 'The Alchemist' by Paulo Coelho
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    Jul 9 2012: Dandelion Wine - Ray Bradbury
    The Glass Bead Game- Herman Hesse
    After Dark- Haruki Murakami
    The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao- Junot Diaz
    Naked Lunch- William s. Burroughs.

    and Annie On My Mind- Nancy Garden
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      Jul 9 2012: Carolina, I have not read these except for Naked lunch. Thanks for adding to my reading list. I will be enriched by your sugggestions.
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    Jul 11 2012: Thanks everybody for your suggestions, I'll read those I haven't. I hope more people add their must-reads.
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    Jul 9 2012: 1. The Bible

    2. '1984' by George Orwell

    3. 'Long Walk to Freedom' by Nelson Mandela

    4. 'The Complete C.S.Lewis Signature Classics' by C.S. Lewis

    5. 'The Alchemist' by Paulo Coelho