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Anita Doron

filmmaker - curator of magic unrealism,

TEDCRED 500+

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Wealth and power have been our conventional measures of success. What definition will better sustain us now and how can we move into it?

The other day, my mother mentioned that she hasn't accomplished anything in her life. (She's a forest and machine engineer who hasn't found a suitable job since immigrating from the Soviet Union 20 years ago) It broke my heart to hear this. We live in a world that makes people value themselves more and more singularly by their career highs and financial prowess.

The conventional model of success has proven to be destructive, separating and pitting us against each other in competition.

What would be a better definition of accomplishment for us and how could we collectively shift toward embracing this?

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  • Jun 3 2011: Creativity is driven by need for survival. Therefore, social system are the reason for killing creativity. As an evidence, most people in middle eastern and asian countries have high level of education, and strong theoretical scientific knowledges, but due to their social system, there has been no need to be creative to help the society to survive. As for for example, in US, due to lack of social services, and unpredictability of sustainability, creativity has been a necessity for survival. One might argue that a lot of contribution resulted from creativity has been provided by the east, but they did when social system was not established yet. Also climate is another driving force for creativity. If you are living on the beach and coconut drops on your head, you really don't have to do much to live one. But if you are by north pole, then you have to be creative to feed yourself and keep yourself warm. So I don't think schools are responsible for killing creativity, its the social system!

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