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Randy W Horton

Entrepeneur - internet marketing, Entrepreneur

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A reverse online auction, (Quote ME). A place where companies compete for my business.

I make many purchases online and spend more time looking for the best deal than I ever spent studing about the actual item to be purchased. I propose that we simply creat a place where we post our items to be purchased and companies submit a quote to us. EXAMPLE: I am going to purchase a new Scion FRS car within 30 days and I post it to the auction as a Request For Quotation that expires in 30 days. Individuals and/or dealers then submit their price and then compete for my business. This has been done for years by government, big companies etc. I think it is now time for individuals to benefit from this also. I am seeking help in Implementation of this sure to be viral way to buy!

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    Jun 23 2012: Hi Randy, this seems like a problematic idea, with many drawbacks. The problem is that it might not really make a big difference, because you'll still have to read and go through all the detailed proposals that you receive. So you'll spend a lot of time, just selecting the best offer. A bit like you do when visiting webshops. But when you look into a shop, your brain judges instantly. Whereas when you have to read an offer, you judge more slowly.

    Another problem is that when an individual checks out shops, he has a very detailed idea of what he wants. If you turn this model upside down, the seller has to have a very good idea of what you want. And that's not possible. You can describe your wishes in a very detailed manner, but the ultimate purchase often depends on factors you can't describe (a particular esthetic appeal, a style element, etc....). And most of all: context (the appeal of a website, the track-record of the seller, etc...)

    In short, I'm not sure this will work for ordinary purchases by ordinary individuals. It works for government and big companies, because they have an entire department working on judging the best offers. They also spend weeks or months in formulating what they want and need. An individual cannot ever begin to do this. His brain does so when he checks out shops. Writing everything down, as you suggest, is too time-consuming.

    Finally, why would a tender not simply refer to his company's website? He'll say: check out my product at www.---.com , and thanks. That too is a problem. How else would he present his product to you? By copying and pasting photos from his website, and by customizing an offer, just to satisfy one client? That's too much to ask. He will simply refer to his site.