Magda Marcu

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In your experience, what did you find to work best for promoting TED to people who were unlikely to be TED fans?

Methods and approaches that you used successfully to open the minds of people who were not likely or even resistant to have tried TED on their own.

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    Feb 22 2011: Sorry, what I should have said is "WHADAYA MEAN YOUR NOT A TED FAN!?"
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    Feb 17 2011: "When the disciple is ready, the Guru appears."
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    Feb 16 2011: In my personal experience, I believe by sharing the link of interesting TED talk with them, works better. Almost, everyone I personally recommended to watch a particular talk, replied me, saying thanks and they loved it. It is really a contagious. And they glad that they have something amazing to share with their friend.

    And I repeat it. It contagious.
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      Feb 17 2011: I have tried that, and in my experience it was a hit and miss. Usually, people are so busy that it is hard for them to put aside the average 20 minutes of a TED talk. They put it the talk on hold, planning to watch it later until they forget about it. :(
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    Feb 16 2011: Ask anyone you meet people "What are you passionate about and care deeply about in your life ?"

    Almost certainly there will be some TED talk related to their passion, field of interest, Tell them to check that talk out at TED.com

    Optional: you might also like warning them: HIGHLY INSPIRATION and AMAZINGLY ADDICTIVE ;-)
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      Feb 17 2011: You are right about that, it is amazingly addictive. And yes, indeed it is easier with people who have a passion or an interest. But what about the ones who don't have one yet? Those are the ones most unlikely to be TED fans. Someone who has a passion are probably already addicted.
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    Feb 22 2011: I would pack my bags and work for TED at the drop of a hat and I can say without a doubt it has changed my life and the way I see the world and myself in it. That said I still come a little unstuck when I am trying to explain what TED is. I think the idea of sharing a link is good as has been pointed out because the talk will usually speak much louder than any attempt to explain what TED is about. I did a Minute informal TEDex. There were three families at my house for dinner and we started talking about our children and education. I said "You have to see this" and I put Sir Ken Robinson on. You could have heard a pin drop. My next door neighbor who was one of the group has since watched that talk a dozen times and many more talks on TED. The thing is like you say to get the thing in front of them.
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    Feb 17 2011: In my experience: find a talk that validates their worldview, or find a talk with a speaker or ideas that they would consider fascinating and perhaps a little more than they could be/come up with by themselves. I know that this sounds like a soulless marketing strategy, but the most important thing is that once they're done watching something they find interesting, pleasing, but not very challenging (although they may not agree with this one), they are likely to click through to another talk that will shake their horizons a bit and make them a bigger person, so I think my strategy is ethically justified ;)
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    Feb 17 2011: There are many comments from many different angles available on Ted.com. I have hooked people with many different talks. If you talk of sustainability, i throw this at you : http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_barber_s_surprising_foie_gras_parable.html

    If your an adrenaline junky i throw http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/ueli_gegenschatz_extreme_wingsuit_jumping.html
    at you.

    so.. really, its a matter of pulling someone in via their own interests and letting them get lost for themselves.
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    Feb 17 2011: Very rarely I find on TED two talks on the same subject, by the same presenter, one that is 3 minutes long and the other 20 minutes long. For example www.ted.com/talks/dean_ornish_says_your_genes_are_not_your_fate.html and www.ted.com/talks/dean_ornish_on_healing.html

    This is something I find very helpful to get more people to watch TEDs. I give them the link to the first one making sure I mention it is only 3 minutes and tell them that if they like it, there is more where that came from. They always ask for more. Unfortunately, there aren't many talks on TED that have a three minute version.
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    Feb 16 2011: Recommending a link by someone in their own field, I directed musicians to Benjamin Zander for example.