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Robert Winner

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REVIEWING MAHATMA GHANDI'S 7 DANGERS TO HUMAN VIRTUE AND APPLYING THEM TO TODAYS WORLD.

SEVEN DANGERS TO HUMAN VIRTUE

1. Wealth without work
2. Pleasure without conscience
3. Knowledge without character
4. Business without ethics
5. Science without humanity
6. Religion without sacrifice
7. Politics without principle

Ghandi (2 Oct 1869 - 30 Jan 1948) outlined these universal dangers that appear to have the same weight today as they did in his lifetime.

Of these seven at least one applies to approximately 90% of the TED Talks I have viewed and conversations I have read.

What do you think of this list? Can you add to it? Can we use the list to evoke change for the better? How?

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  • Jun 18 2012: Just a thought - how about 6. Religion without tolerance? And maybe the greatest danger of all... 8. Life without purpose
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    Jun 3 2012: I thought he termed them the “Seven Blunders of the World.”
    This is the list I have in my reading material:

    • Wealth without work
    • Pleasure without conscience
    • Knowledge without character
    • Commerce without morality
    • Science without humanity
    • Worship without sacrifice
    • Politics without principle

    Did you know his grandson Arun Gandhi is said to have added an eighth:

    • Rights without responsibilities


    Very thought provoking list Robert.
    When I first read Ghandi's list in a blurb inside a magazine article I though: "humans haven't changed much".

    In your opinion, which one applies to TED Talks?
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      Jun 4 2012: These are so broad that they can be applied in part or in whole to talks and conversations that are along the same lines or subject matter.

      By the way I pulled up both Dangers of virtue and blunders of the world and they are the same.

      Yep your right we humans have not changed much and I do not see much change on the horizon.

      I had never hear these refered to as blunders ... I learned something new. Thanks. Bob.