Matheus Campos

Renovatus

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How many books have you read this year?

Which of them deserve be in this discussion? Do you recommend it for anyone? Why?

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    Jun 1 2012: Since buying my Kindle in 2010 I've not read a single paper book, but my reading has increased massively.

    In the last 12 months I've read the following e-books - all excellent and recommended.

    In no particular order...

    Non-fiction:

    Txting:The Gr8 Db8 - David Crystal
    How to be Free - Tom Hodgkinson
    They F*** You Up: How to Survive Family - Oliver James
    A Book of Silence - Sara Maitland
    Out of Our Minds:Learning to be Creative - Ken Robinson
    How to Live Off-Grid - Nick Rosen
    Small is Beautiful - E F Schumacher
    Walden - Henry David Thoreau

    Bio and Travel

    Chasing the Monsoon - Alexander Frater
    Tales from the Torrid Zone - Alexander Frater
    Storyteller: The Life of Roald Dahl
    India's Undending Journey - Mark Tully
    Me Talk Pretty One Day - David Sedaris
    The Corfu Trilogy - Gerald Durrell

    Fiction

    Expecting Someone Taller - Tom Holt
    The Far Pavilions - M M Kaye
    The Secret Life of Bees - Sue Monk Kidd
    Ghostwritten - David Mitchell
    The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - Deborah Moggach
    The Help - Kathryn Stockett
    The Holy Man - Susan Trott
    A Patchwork Planet - Anne Tyler
    Harnessing Peacocks - Mary Wesley
    Carry On, Jeeves - P G Wodehouse
    Lord Arthur Savil's Crime - Oscar Wild
    Only the Innocent - Rachel Abbott
    Started Early, Took My Dog - Kate Atkinson
    The Club of Queer Trades - G K Chesterton
    Dead Lagoon - Michael Dibdin
    Acqua Alta - Donna Leon
    The Complete Sherlock Holmes - A C Dolye
    Enigma - Robert Harris
    The Lighthouse - P D James

    History and Religon

    The Case for God - Karen Armstrong
    The Bible - Karen Armstrong
    Europe's Last Summer - David FromKin
    Europe at War 1939 - 1945 - Norman Davies
    Mao's Great Famine - Frank Dikotter
    Austerity Britian - David Kynaston
  • Jun 18 2012: I am a 14-year-old student in china and I am required to read so many books which are connected to Maths, Physics and Chemistry. We don't have time to read books such as Lords of Rings
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      Jun 28 2012: hi Linfeng, i do understand what you meant, cause many students in China includig me face such kind of problems. we are under pretty pressure from school and must spend most of our time on homework or something like that. but i still believe there will be some little spare time you could find in your daily life anyway. if you can take well advantage of them , you will definitely make a big difference about reading. According to my experience, most of books which i have read were just finished during the scattered time in my life. i even treat it as a way to relax and flee from the boring schoolwork for the moment. if you really want to do something you can always find methods and save the time to do it, right?good luck
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      Yan Li

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      Jun 28 2012: gosh, i am so surprised to see members as young as you on this forum, cool! Listen, never sacrifice your love for reading just for those required school works, but i bet you will do great since you realize the problem at such an early stage. :D
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    Jun 16 2012: I have read 20-30 books but mostly aloud to my little girls :).
  • Jun 3 2012: I cannot help but think of people who I will never meet who I can try to understand through
    a book . Count Korzibisky in general semantics called this time binding. It makes us
    a sentient species. Of course, two thousand years ago or whatever - what were they saying
    really. Look at Marcus Aurielius the fifth of the five(8) good emperors. How do you put
    his writings into modern English or whatever.
  • Jun 1 2012: actually none
    I have to change
    my life is without a meaning
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    Jun 21 2012: an appalling total of 2! Superfreakonomics, and "The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared " by Jonas Jonasson. I definitely recommend it, and indeed I've passed my copy around twice already (so easy with paper back, yes paper!) It's about a centenarian who runs away from an old people's home and this old man is no ordinary guy... it's witty, funny, picaresque, and so uplifting, it beats any prozac-like drug.
    books... I've sort of lied, because I keep re-reading some classics, and this year, it's been Victor Hugo's poemes "Les contemplations', as to me that's everything poetry should ever be, and Voltaire's "Le Fanatisme" so modern that it's scary.
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    Jun 14 2012: I read two books every week. Have read so much this year. I recommend 'Disgrace' by J M Coetzee; 'It's Time For Your Comeback' by Tim Storey; and 'Mere Christianity', 'Miracles' and 'The Problem of Pain', all by C. S. Lewis.

    I read 'The Testament' by John Grisham for the 2nd time this year, and it is still my best book by the author. I read 'The Last Juror' by the same author and love it.
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    Jun 12 2012: I try to read a book a week, but sometimes end up taking such detailed notes and look up so many technical details I fall short. Also I often re-read books with a yellow notepad at my side (chuckle: guess it's obvious I'm mostly into non-fiction, huh.). I'd guess that in the last 12 months: 30-40 books; since January 1st, perhaps 15-20. It's hard to pin down which have been the best, since I tend to be selective.... Biggest 'discovery' was Charles Dickens, who I always thought of as 'the guy who wrote about Scrooge'. He's even better than Wilkie Collins! In the non-fiction arena, my most recent (and a fantastic) read was Barbara Tuchman's history of the first month of World War One: "The Guns of August". That one had me scouring the net for maps and looking up biographies and orders of battle on Wikipedia. I'm now re-reading Eric Newby's autobiographical tale about his 1938 trip round the world on one of the last commercial sailing ships. He was 18. The book: "The Last Grain Race". So many books... so little time.
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    Jun 11 2012: Around 100 in the last 12 months. Mostly non-fiction. I`m now reading Daniel Kahneman`s "Thinking Fast and Slow" and I cannot believe how simple the concept is! And it started with Ian`s Albery work on automaticity in addictions through John Bargh`s articles on automaticity, even in something as important and worth being aware of as relationships, via Lindstrom`s books explaining why we buy and certain products to Ariely`s books on irrational decision making and now Kahneman`s theory for all this, or at least some of this.
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      E G

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      Jun 12 2012: Oh , you must be a computer .
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      Jun 16 2012: Maja - If you like Daniel Kahneman's book, you might also like 'The Master and His Emissary' by Iain McGilchrist. In place of Kahneman's 'Systems1 and 2', McGilchrist refers to the right and left brain hemispheres to explain human behaviour, only in more detail, and then goes on to explain its relevance in Western Society.

      Both are real eye-openers in my opinion.
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    Jun 4 2012: I've read 19 and whereas I usually focus on non-fiction, I've read a lot of fiction and biographies. Fun Bios include Dick Van Dyke's. Others worth reading are Howard Cosell's and Pat Buchanan's. Favorite non-fiction book this year is Lisa Randall's "Knocking on Heaven's Door."
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    Jun 4 2012: I thought I was doing well having read 5 books so far this year; then I see everyone's list and wonder what I've been doing! I'm currently reading 2 books at the same time - one fiction, one nonfiction. Depending on my mood, I open the appropriate book.

    My favorite so far this year has been The Meaning of Night, by Michael Cox. It is his first book, and a very dark Victorian mystery. I'm currently reading Drift by Rachel Maddow, and the non-fiction book title escapes my mind just now. (It's also not that great, but I refuse to stop with the hope it will get better).

    I get about 45 min to an hour a day to read while I'm on the train to and from work.
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    Jun 4 2012: I try to read at least one book per month. The book I loved most this year was "life of pie"
    I also liked Thousand splendid suns, Norwegian wood and Tipping point.
    http://www.goodreads.com/
    this site is a really nice site where you can keep track of what you read and to find good book suggestions.
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    Jun 3 2012: Probably +10, mostly fiction of various genres. I enjoy anything as long as its well written and intelligent (by my standards), particularly if it's a bit quirky by the likes of Haruki Murakami.

    By the way anyone who poo poo's genre fiction should take a look at some of the classics. Detective fiction - "Bleak house" by Charles Dickens, science fiction - "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" by Robert Louis Stevenson. The list is endless, unlike a narrow mind.
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    Jun 3 2012: I read one book, called "Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom" and this was an amazing book at the end...Even it doesnt make sense initially but slowly we ll be able to connect the dots at the end. A must read especially for the younger generation.
    It is all about philosophy in a simple way.
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    Jun 3 2012: 1 ever week more or less
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    Jun 3 2012: I read some fictions.
  • Jun 3 2012: Excellent, excellent question. I've lost track, but I'd say about a dozen. (I'm retired, so I have the time.) I'm currently reading "America on Trial" by Alan Dershowitz, an excellent book on the major trials of our history that have either established legal precedents, or shown up the weaknesses in our legal system. I recommend it to anyone interested in politics and the law. I'm also reading "Battle Cry of Freedom", a history of our Civil War given to me by a friend. Hey, I wrote a book! (14, actually). Wanna read mine? "Becoming Human in the Cosmos: The Purpose and Ultimate Destiny of Human Life" by Lee Hazelle. Available on Amazon Kindle. It'll set you back $5.
  • Jun 2 2012: I have read several books this year. My favorite being The Emperor of All Maladies. This book is the biography of Cancer and it's treatment. A wonderfully informative book. My next favorite is Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail. This book has inspired me to try the Pacific Crest Trail.
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    Jun 2 2012: Unfortunately this year I could only read one book. The Kite Runner.
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      Jun 2 2012: YOKES! That is not the one I would have reccommended for you, Rafi!
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        Jun 3 2012: Can I ask why ?
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          Jun 3 2012: Sure Rafi, I will answer almost anything I can for you because I admire you!
          I find the warlord character objectionable and it seems to me because the book was printed in the US so I worry that parts of it are propaganda. I love the unacknowledged son and his bravery and loyalty. I was offered the sequel while i was in the hospital in the form of a book on cd and I was not convinced that it would contribute to my healing. I would like to read it now though. I would love to see the kite festival!
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        Jun 3 2012: Thank you Debra for explanation.

        I actually decided to read this book because whenever I was abroad specially in the subcontinent I was usually asked Have you read the the Kite Runner ? & when my answer was No. They were getting surprised how you live in Kabul have not read the Kite Runner . & I was kind a feeling embarrassed.

        Finally I read it but it also made me emotional on many occasions where I had experienced myself or had seen others in same situations. but overall I liked the book.
  • Jun 2 2012: lots of books after I have a kindle 4.
  • Jun 2 2012: only 1 book still in process。
  • Jun 2 2012: I would guess around 10, the most notable were.
    The Pleasure of Finding Things Out - Richard Feynman
    Physics for the Rest of Us - Roger Jones
    Sophie's World - Jostein Gaarder
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      Jun 2 2012: Hi Adam! I read one called Physics for Dummies.- I NEEDED TO!
  • Jun 2 2012: One, I can remember reading thirty in a month ... Oh, How time has passed.
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    Jun 2 2012: We are serious readers around our house. I keep one by the bedside, in the toliet, in the livingroom, in the car, etc... anyone who knows me expects me to have a book in hand. I rotate books often but have never kept a count of how many. We do hard backs, e-books, soft cover, etc... I always try to read the book prior to seeing the movie (when it exists). My imagination is very vivid and I am sometimes disappointed in the movie.

    Neat topic. All the best. Bob
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    Jun 1 2012: Not sure I could put an accurate number on it. However, the three most recent books that I highly recommend are The Power of Habit - a look at how habits form and how to change them, Imagine - a look at how creativity really happens, not the typical mythology about creativity and The Next Decade - a strategist's view of what the next ten year's might look like. I just got Quiet as part of today's TED book pack and look forward to hearing more about Susan Cain's thoughts on how introverts can operate in an extroverted world.
  • Jun 1 2012: Eleven, but five of them were associated with my studies
  • Jun 1 2012: 10 books, admittedly mostly fiction and none recent.
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    Jun 1 2012: About 5 , and plainning to read 3 more once I'll finish this one :)
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    Jun 1 2012: Well, I have read one so far but now I am actually trying to get thru another one.
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    Jun 1 2012: I started to read maybe 5 or 6 books but finished none... too busy playing tennis and surfing the web...
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    Jun 1 2012: Non technical-None.
    Technical-Still reading!!!
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    Jun 1 2012: Many- maybe 4 or 5 per week.
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      Jun 1 2012: 4.5 x 52 = 234

      Wow! I don't read as many road signs.
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        Jun 1 2012: They laughed at the hospital too! I went in for surgery and they took a ring off my finger that had not been off for 20 years and then they opened my suitcase to find one change of clothing and 4 hard bck books. I thought I would be out in 3 days!
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        Jun 1 2012: The smary alek in me was tempted to say--- BOOKS!

        I read almost everything. I have talked about some of them here: Deadly Spin, The Better Angels of our nature, Psychology of everyday things and Sex at Dawn.
        The only downside is knowing the plot of every moviehem it comes out!

        There is a new book on the Googeplex that gives insight into the role of former Google people at the White House. (My son read aloud to me when I was in a coma and the man in the other bed and his son really enjoyed his reading- and then that man died) I also love fiction and there are a variety of American authors that write compelling novels. (With due respect to Canadian authors- I have only read a few of them and I am not big on Margaret Atwood- uoh I think I just blasphemed)

        I should mention that I don't have cable or an antenna and reading is so quiet and peaceful for someone like me.
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      Jun 7 2012: Per WEEK - lucky you!
  • Jun 1 2012: Maybe not always sell selected. A goodly number - Usually nonfiction. Most important is what I

    want to read. Jared Diamond's new book, Francis Fukayama's new book, and anything by Thomas FRiedman.
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    Jun 1 2012: I am not comfortable sharing how many I have read, but I am happy to recommend a few I have read recently. One is edited by John Brockman of Edge and is called This Will Make You Smarter. I don't like the title, because it makes it sound like a self-help book. Rather, about 150 of the world's foremost scholars in science, economics, and other fields were asked what single idea would be most valuable for people to have in their toolkits to help them think better about the gamut of questions you might want to think about. Each response is about two pages or at most four.
    Another I have read recently is a much older book called The Norton anthology of Personal Essays, which has in it some of the best essays written in English in this century.
    The other things I have read in the last month probably aren't of as broad interest, but you couldn't go wrong with the work of Clay Shirky or Steven Johnson, both TED speakers.
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      Jun 1 2012: Lovely responce! I have the Norton anthology of English lit and I love those books. The one you refer to sounds really great. I got mine as a student.
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    Jun 28 2012: I can't read.. I'd rather watch Family Guy instead..

    Peter Griffin encompasses all the knowledge I need..
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    Jun 28 2012: Not sure how many I've read - I start many books, certainly more than I finish, too old to bother with something that doesn't hold my interest - but the last one that really stayed with me was The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi. It's sf that takes place in a future of genetically engineered crops where the most valuable commodity is the genetic code of plants that are extinct stored in seeds. It got me interested in seed banks and as a result translated Cary Fowler: One seed at a time, protecting the future of food and Jonathan Drori: Why we're storing billions of seeds.
  • Jun 28 2012: 21 so far, gosto muito ler livros!
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    Yan Li

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    Jun 28 2012: like 5 or 6, and i just finished reading a book called "the hunger games", well, it is popular and an easy-to-read type.. i would recommend "to kill a mockingbird" which is a classic but tells a really moving story. and Amy Tan's the kitchen god's wife, cause since i am a Chinese, Amy's book really got me related. :D
  • Jun 28 2012: No of books read is around 15 and of that 3 to 5 books made impact
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    Jun 28 2012: As of now 4 and about to finish my fifth. I need to read more however... haha
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    Jun 28 2012: a very gud question..it reminded me that im wasting my time... as far as now i have read onle one :(
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      Jun 28 2012: oohhh tats gud u can nw write a book on ways wasting time...........
      :-)
  • Jun 28 2012: My father owned the entire collection of Zane Grey and my mother read Danielle Steel books. I imagine the total number of books read by them would add up to a reasonable number. I'm not dismissing the value of an entertaining read, but the quality of a book is more relevant to me than the quantity. I think there is more to gain from a single classic then there is from a years worth of trashy novels. But that's my personal preference. (and to answer the question - about 10)
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    Jun 28 2012: I think i have read 7 books other than my engineering books, now half way to the book named P S I Love you..
  • Jun 24 2012: about 50 books. that is a good quesion, helping me to realize that i need to read more books except novels. Besides, i also recommend 1984 and Sophie' s World.
  • Jun 23 2012: I think about four or five, this question has helped me realise that I need to make more time for reading books. I'm aware that I read a lot of articles, blogs, etc but not so many books. Out of the books I've read so far the two most memorable are David Rock's, Your Brain at work and David Brooks, The Social Animal. I also do tend to re-read books.
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    Jun 21 2012: So far, 17, right now I am reading the volume 03 of the Mozart Series By Christian Jacq and also I am reading "Night" de Elie Wiesel (yeah, I do read more than one book at a time, but not always. It just happens.) and I have lined up " The Future of Freedom" by Fareed Zakaria.
    Nice question, nice topic, nice to see all the answers you got it.
  • Jun 21 2012: hi Matheus and all

    I think I have read something like 16 or 18 book so far this year. It came to be a been in two weeks or so, depends on subject and amount. I wish I could spend more time on reading. (working on PhotoReading this will speed up)

    To discuss here? my books were about NLP / leadership / negotiation / sales - (no novels yet) I don't think that these subjects are to discuss here but some do talk about business environment and leadership here.

    I recomeneded a boot to a friends (but I read it years ago) and I do recommend it here - Henry David Thoreau 's WALDEN - (I believe some of you might know it) - it's a non-business book.

    As Thoreau said: "the world is full of fantastic books that no one reads"

    Funny eanough, I join to this talk because a few days ago on News Channel they said that in Spain, a person reads a book per year, an avarage number. Which is sad. I have students 14 - 16 years old, hardly few reads.

    do you want to know the sadest part? Internet kills Book Reading, (I wish I was wrong)
    nowadays some youth spends more time on Facebook than with book.
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    Jun 21 2012: 7 books (and about half way through one now). I set myself a goal of 20 books (originally 24, but who am I kidding, I'm a slow reader) this year but so far I am well behind pace. I've been setting myself reading goals to push me to read more, you can do that on shelfari.com. On the other hand, I'm buying more books than ever so the library keeps filling up beyond capacity.

    The most notable books I've read so far this year are The Blank Slate (watch the TEDtalk, that's what got me interested in the first place), The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat and (in the much ignored in recent years category of fiction) Day of the Triffids.

    I recommend The Blank Slate to everyone, it is the best book I've read in the last 3 years.
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      Jun 21 2012: Steven Pinker and Oliver Sachs are indeed wonderful reads, almost regardless of which choices you make from their writings.
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      Jun 28 2012: hi Matthieu,i totally agree with your method to settding a goal for yourself ,cause it can serve as a reminder to help us squeeze time do something meaningful such as reading. i will have a try in the coming days.
  • Jun 21 2012: i wish i could have read more but i only red 5 books so far :(
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    Jun 21 2012: i was stumped at this question. I have never counted how many books i have read before let alone how many i read in a year. But i guess i have read an average of 30 books a year. More if i have time.
    but i love re-reading. i think when i read i fall in love with characters so i read the book again just to have my fave characters alive in my mind again.
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    Jun 21 2012: Well a good year 2 so far beats my yearly average by 2. Maybe age maybe a need that been repressed for some time. Oh well just roll with it I guess.
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    Jun 18 2012: Nine so far, most of them I had to read for school (and loved them!) They were all postmodern novels. I'd recommend 'The New York trilogy' by Paul Auster or the 'White Noise' by Don DeLillo. ICurrently reading the 'Platform' by Michel Houellebecq..
    + I translate books so I have to read them - I completed the 'The Second Duchess' by Elizabeth Loupas and am currently working on 'Yoga Bitch' by Suzanne Morrison (who has nothing to do with the amazing Toni Morrison that wrote "Beloved" that I also read last month - and is a book I'd also recommend!) :)
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    Jun 18 2012: I have not read all the replies in this thread, so forgive me if I am redundant here, but Joseph Stiglitz's new book The Price of Inequality is a valuable read for someone who wants to understand economics well enough to decide for himself which arguments that claim to economic validity are actually valid and which are only self serving to those who make the argument.
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    Jun 18 2012: It's a long time that I have not read any paper printed book and all my reading is done via my rss reader. I read for 3/4 hours daily and I usually do it either on my laptop or my mobile phone via rss reader. I spend the rest of my free time watching documentaries. this is by no means suggesting that books are in their way out but I think we should find ways to bring them back. a recent research showed that reading and the conversion of words to meanings and images in brain is absolutely essential for creativity and thus can never be replaced by multimedia.
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    Jun 17 2012: about 30, but at least half of them I was "reading" just as newspapers - looking for specific informations, not from cover to cover
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    Jun 16 2012: I read online all the time. So thousands upon thousands of articles news, science etc...

    I've physically held & read 2 books a year. Bad thing to admit to, unlike Jamie I dont read Oliver.

    Truman Capote & Gary Indiana
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    Aja B.

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    Jun 14 2012: There are some serious readers here on TED.com. 82 books in six months, that's very impressive. I wonder how the average amount of reading in the TED.com community compares to that in the general population?
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    Jun 14 2012: Most of what I read is online articles on various topics. I couldn't tell you how many of those I have read.
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    Jun 14 2012: I like booking reading but I don't get much time to read. I have read just 20 to 30 books this year.
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    Jun 14 2012: 19.
    the only book writen in English is Steve Jobs, write by Walter Isaacson. It is my first complete foreign book.
    My favorite book is a Chinese classic book, but I don't think which one here can read it. so just ignore it.
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    Jun 14 2012: About 20 books.
  • Jun 14 2012: In too Loud a Solitude by Bohumil Hrabl. Great book! Quick read too.

    I really like books like this that are based on philosophy, but I find that its better to have a hard copy, because it is too easy to forget about books I download onto my computer. I end up re-reading books a lot even though I have access to new ones, just because I find myself wondering if there was more to the idea explored in a book than I remember it being about. (Takes place in Soviet Union Czechoslovakia. Prague I believe. There's also discussion at length of gypsy's, and apparitions of Jesus and Lao Tzu, that I enjoyed).

    &

    The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci.

    This book was suggested to me by my history teacher, and I always figured he wrote it and authored it under a pseudonym. Great book about Ricci's Jesuit method for memorization techniques. Its more of the story of what he did in China when he went there in the 15th Century, in order to be a missionary. He taught himself Chinese with the memory palace method and tried to teach the method to the Chinese, but it was not well received. He converted several Chinese people to Christians (Jesuits), and made many friends in the aristocracy of whatever dynasty was in charge of China at the time. (By John D. Spencer. Takes place in Ming China).
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    Jun 14 2012: I am a reading demon and go through approximately 3 books per week (I'm a speed reader). One of my faves so far this year is The Bronze Horseman, by Paulina Simons. It is part of a series of three books but this is by far the best book and gives you a stark, realistic and gritty view of the siege of Leningrad during World war 2. Where literally millions of Russians starved to death within the city, and some even resorted to cannibalism to survive. The story is actually a love story set during this time, between a russian girl and a soldier in the red army, but he is not who they think he is. The love story for me was not what was important, it was the political and social issues around communism and the lengths the Soviet Union went to to keep control of it's population. Seriously, don't let the romantic aspect turn you off reading this book. this was the kind of book that had me jumping on line and researching the seige of Leningrad, as this was not something I previously knew about. I was compelled to find out more.
    This book will make you think, cry, laugh, and will help you to understand the kind of suffering and resilience that most of us could never understand. Worth the read.
  • Jun 13 2012: 82. Geez, that sounds like a lot, but I think I may knock off more this year. So much to absorb :-)
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    Jun 12 2012: 3 so far. Recently...Being Wrong by Kathryn Schulz. Its about mistakes we make and will not admit them. Even to ourselfs.
  • Jun 12 2012: Let me count -
    India : A Million Mutinies Now (V S Naipaul ) ,
    Deep Focus (Satyajit Ray articles),
    The Imperfectionist (Tom Rachman),
    The White Tiger (Aravind Adiga).

    Currently Reading:
    Life of Pi
    Gitanjali

    I might have missed a few. So about 6-7 books.
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    Jun 12 2012: Not half as many asI had planned, and sadly only about half of each of those.
  • Jun 12 2012: 14 — 2 novels, 12 non-fiction — so far in 2012.

    The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them. ~ Mark Twain

    Most recent: "Fahrenheit 451," following death of Ray Bradbury, who loved libraries. Most taken by the "ear thimbles" that keep the people numbed out in their own little world. Sound familiar?
  • Jun 12 2012: I always have a book by the bed, by the couch and in the car. But the best book I've read this year was Love, Margie, available electronically. Largely autobiographical, it is funny, provocative, poignant and written by a little known author, Lynne Colton Sadrai. Me. Not for the prudish.
  • Jun 12 2012: 'The monk who sold his ferarri' by robin sharma...a story which teach us to create a new life of passion.purpose.nd peace....

    'Better india better world' by N R narayana moorty....the co-founder of infosis......the collection of his speechs held in various parts of the globe...
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    Jun 12 2012: I have read around 10 books this half year.I'm a sort of book-worm.
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    Jun 12 2012: Up till now, 14. If you're interested in something thought-provoking, then I recommend Malcolm Gladwell's 'The Tipping Point' (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2612.The_Tipping_Point) and 'Outliers: The Story of Success' (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3228917-outliers).

    If you haven't signed up on Goodreads (www.goodreads.com) yet, I suggest you do right away.


    There are so many great books out there just waiting to be read!
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    E G

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    Jun 12 2012: 0.1
  • Jun 7 2012: 31. 3 by Jean-Paul Sartre.
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    Jun 7 2012: About 20. I've read five novels by Irish writer Sebastian Barry,
    all very good.
  • Jun 6 2012: The Diving Bell and the Butterfly - Jean-Dominique Bauby

    http://tinyurl.com/6ltkhvz

    When you think that your life is not going well and everything is against you, reading this 144 page book will inspire you.
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    Jun 6 2012: This year I read the Lord of the Rings Series. Currently reading Great Expectations and environmental law books for my class.
    • Jun 18 2012: The Rings Series is the only original book I've read in English, it's really worthy of reading once more.
  • Jun 6 2012: I've got a few thought-provoking books:

    1. Johnny Got His Gun: a classic about a soldier who's limbs and face get blown off by a shell in World War 1. Beautifully written. A very anti-war novel, but it doesn't tell you what you already know (that war is bad, etc.). It really makes you think. It is THE most moving and powerful book I have every read.

    2. The Elegant Universe: for all the physics nerds and intellectuals who haven't yet gotten through 7th grade physics... This book is AMAZING; it is fascinating and takes all this advanced material about how the universe works and converts it into 400 pages that I, a 14-year-old who hasn't taken high school physics yet, could understand.

    3. The Weather of the Future: gives real forcasts about what the world will be like in the next few decades if we do not do anything about climate change. Very scary.
    • Jun 12 2012: I first read Johhny Got His Gun 45 years ago. Good to know it is still being read and enjoyed.
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    Jun 5 2012: I rember a line somewhere that went something like: "If you could spend an hour in the presence of a great or successful person how good would that be"
    So books to me do exactly that.

    SYnchronicity is the latest on my list. "the inner path to leadership" by Joseseph Jaworski. Excellent and inspirational for anyone in transition.
  • Jun 4 2012: Not including school books, I've read about 63 books so far this year. It's a pretty even mix between literary fiction, genre fiction and scholarly/critical work.
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    Jun 3 2012: Sure Rafi, I do not like the suggestion that an Afgani war lord would do such a thing to a child. I also hate the role the unacknowledged half brother was forced to play. I deeply admire him as a sweet and loyal human being. though. If a piece of literature comes out of a society I take the characters more seriously but when it comes from an enemy nation especially with an objectionable character you have to wonder if it is propagands. I would dearly love to see the kite festival!