Uriel Natero

UN Music,Inc.

This conversation is closed.

Mosquitoes are the best tools for spreading solutions - they are the cheapest and fastest way to spread chemicals.

How do mosquitoes grow? Mosquitoes have a very interesting and unique biology. They go through 3 stages before maturity - egg, larvae and pupae. Each species has a different set of conditions required to complete this process. Some species lay eggs on damp soil, where they can remain for years before hatching. Another species needs emergent vegetation (such as the common cattail) to complete this process. Other species need saltwater to develop. One basic fact that is constant for all species - stagnant water is required for the maturation cycle.
We can altered this to make them carry the cure and not the diseases."
When a mosquito bites you and its only the females who do, she sucks up some of your blood and leaves something behind, her saliva. Mosquito saliva contains a chemical that stops the blood from clotting, thinning it out so she can finish her lunch.mosquitoes can pass along diseases like West Nile,the protozoa that causes malaria, also carry the virus for yellow fever and dengue fever. In Australia, mosquitoes are carriers of the Ross River Fever and Barmah Forest virus.
Lets try to work with them by helping us to carry the cure and not the diseases."

Closing Statement from Uriel Natero

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    May 15 2012: Tibebu Habtewold, Michael Povelones, Andrew M. Blagborough, George K. Christophides*
    Immunology and Infection, Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

    Despite being phylogenetically very close to Anopheles gambiae, the major mosquito vector of human malaria in Africa, Anopheles quadriannulatus is thought to be a non-vector. Understanding the difference between vector and non-vector mosquitoes can facilitate development of novel malaria control strategies. We demonstrate that An. quadriannulatus is largely resistant to infections by the human parasite Plasmodium falciparum, as well as by the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei. By using genetics and reverse genetics, we show that resistance is controlled by quantitative heritable traits and manifested by lysis or melanization of ookinetes in the mosquito midgut, as well as by killing of parasites at subsequent stages of their development in the mosquito. Genes encoding two leucine-rich repeat proteins, LRIM1 and LRIM2, and the thioester-containing protein, TEP1, are identified as essential in these immune reactions. Their silencing completely abolishes P. berghei melanization and dramatically increases the number of oocysts, thus transforming An. quadriannulatus into a highly permissive parasite host. We hypothesize that the mosquito immune system is an important cause of natural refractoriness to malaria and that utilization of this innate capacity of mosquitoes could lead to new methods to control transmission of the disease.
    please keep reading at=
    http://www.plospathogens.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.ppat.1000070
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      Jun 13 2012: Thanks for this knowledgable insight. =)

      This version made more sense to my mind that has a lack of knowledge for higher sciences. =)

      Best Wishes in Life.
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    May 15 2012: I sure hope you will continue to contribute here!
    This is the sort ofr contribution that makes everyone think !
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    May 16 2012: Brilliant idea, but this could also be used for evil. We could be harmed more cheaply and efficiently, without our knowledge.
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    May 15 2012: Yes to all of you !!
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    May 15 2012: There many things around us which we can change their effects from bad to good :)
  • May 15 2012: what cure will the mosquitoes carry?
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    May 15 2012: Never thought of that before. That sounds like stopping the problem at the source.
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    May 14 2012: Tibebu Habtewold, Michael Povelones, Andrew M. Blagborough, George K. Christophides*
    Immunology and Infection, Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

    Despite being phylogenetically very close to Anopheles gambiae, the major mosquito vector of human malaria in Africa, Anopheles quadriannulatus is thought to be a non-vector. Understanding the difference between vector and non-vector mosquitoes can facilitate development of novel malaria control strategies. We demonstrate that An. quadriannulatus is largely resistant to infections by the human parasite Plasmodium falciparum, as well as by the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei. By using genetics and reverse genetics, we show that resistance is controlled by quantitative heritable traits and manifested by lysis or melanization of ookinetes in the mosquito midgut, as well as by killing of parasites at subsequent stages of their development in the mosquito. Genes encoding two leucine-rich repeat proteins, LRIM1 and LRIM2, and the thioester-containing protein, TEP1, are identified as essential in these immune reactions. Their silencing completely abolishes P. berghei melanization and dramatically increases the number of oocysts, thus transforming An. quadriannulatus into a highly permissive parasite host. We hypothesize that the mosquito immune system is an important cause of natural refractoriness to malaria and that utilization of this innate capacity of mosquitoes could lead to new methods to control transmission of the disease.
    please keep reading at=
    http://www.plospathogens.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.ppat.1000070
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      May 15 2012: Your comment has a lot to understand. Is there a simplified version?
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    May 14 2012: @Uriel: Thanks for initiating this conversation. All of what you say with regard to the requirements and biology of mosquitoes is correct. I am not sure how you wish to 'help' mosquitoes carry the cure rather than the diseases. Are your referring to the science of making mosquitoes refractory (i.e. unable to develop the pathogen in them)?