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mark johnson

CEO Life To The Brim, Inc, Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Prisons, Retired

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Do we Ignore incarcerated men, women and juveniles or help Restore them back into community?

I am recent retired Department of Justice employee (Federal Bureau of Prisons)and Dream Coach. Part of my life's purpose is to Inspire, Impact, Empower and help Transfrom those in the space I occupy. Understanding that rehabilitation does not happen just by incarcerating a person, but actually takes place when the individual recognizes the need to change from the inside.

The likelihood of this happening is when (society) the institution create and provide programs for the inmate to participate in while incarcerated. Is such an idea grandiose? And if not what type of programs would cost effective and cognitively meaninful?

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    Jun 3 2012: We ignore them! I met a nineteen year old girl who had just come out of prison on a fellony drug charge and because she could not afford to have her record expunged, she could not get a job for over two years, she was only given $100 a month from the state to survive on, when she got out she was placed in large skid row half way house where she lived within restrictions like curfews, was forced to live with men and women some life time professional fellons that knew more about the system and how to abuse the system and the weaker people in it. Her room was broken into and all her clothes and belongings stolen, a month later she was beaten and raped in that same room. That's when they removed her curfews and let her stay with friends on the outside. I helped her do her resume and get a job. Took 2 and half years. She eventually started to go back to school, but her one and only felony conviction that she got at 18 haunted her every step foward until she eventually committed suicide at the age of 23. She taught me many things, but what she taught me best was that one mistake you can make as a teen... can destroy you and unless you have family to help... everyone turns their backs on you!I believe you can restore them by making them feel like they are worth something! Not throw people away that have amazing potential. She would tell me "Why are you helping me? I'm nothing!" and I'd say "You're amazing someone should've told you that all along... you're talented and smart!" I have more to say, but am out of room.... I am now working with her mother who is doing 9 years in Chowchilla... yes... her Mom and that opens a bigger convo on the creation of a Permanent Felon Class in the U.S.

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