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Intelligent outdoor advertisements

In the course of a university innovation project I am currently working on a idea concerning intelligent outdoor advertisements.

Classical outdoor advertisements (billboards on walls/busses/cabs/etc) have been around for quite a while. Despite small adaptions (e.g. turning 2-3 page panels) on this classical advertisement techniques, existing techniques (GPS, environmental recognition tools) have not been applied.

My business idea consists of the creation of this technique. Advertisements can be specified (light: day/night, time: morning/noon/night, temperature: summer/winter, activity: crowded sidewalk/few people far away/on cabs or busses on their location) and targeted to the current situation or environment of the billboard itself.

I would be very happy to receive some feedback on this. This is my first post on converstaions, so please excuse possible mistakes. I am thankful for any advice!

Topics: advertising
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Closing Statement from Moritz Schulz

Thank you very much for you help! I will try to keep you updated with this project. Your input was a great help.

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    Apr 22 2012: Most targeted advertising is pretty poorly targetted. It would make sense to improve targeting algorithms rather than develop technology to annoy more people with the output from today's crude algorithms.

    And, as Ken says, there is so much advertising clutter about that people are quickly learning to ignore it - why waste effort in creating more clutter?
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    Apr 22 2012: From a surface layer response.

    Billboards and small displays can clutter the landscape to the point where the mind tunes everything out,it becomes an artless jumble like that of movie promotions,in this day and age where resource management is starting to affect the average persons outlook,they could go the way of the dinosaur.

    Here's a TED that i found quite interesting though old i felt this is actually in effect with the twitter in people who are considered tastemakers.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/seth_godin_this_is_broken_1.html
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    Apr 19 2012: I think time of day or seasonal advertisements may make sense for advertisers. I would only put forward also the importance of not having so much going on on these billboards that they distract people from driving safely.
    As someone not involved in advertising or sales, I wish these billboard spaces would detract as little as possible from the natural setting and urban architecture. If they could enhance the setting, it would be even better.
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    Apr 19 2012: Moritz,
    This is a very intriguing idea. I've conducted business in many cities and have noticed that the outdoor advertisements are quite outdated and monotonous. Your idea brings a fresh breath to each advertisement simply based on time of day, etc. For that, I ask: What of the daily commuter? Say a businessman drives to work everyday at 8:00am, and leaves his office at 6:00pm. Based on the location of the advertisement, he may only see those advertisements for a specific season. The ideas behind the rotating-panel billboards (which rotate anywhere from every 10 seconds to 10 minutes) keep the target audience fresh for the time that they are displayed.. something for you to chew on I suppose.

    That being said, I am curious to know if you have ever heard of "Mobile Billboards." They're large, billboard-sized ads on the back of a truck that travel around a major city's busiest intersections all day. It's a fairly new idea. If you could have a variety of trucks with different advertisements on them traveling certain parts of a major city based on time, day, location, and season (as you so suggested), I imagine that that would affect a greater target audience.

    Just my two cents! Hope I helped a bit.