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Dave R
  • Dave R
  • Toronto , Ontario
  • Canada

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Movement causes gravity.

I have a crazy theory that it is the movement of mass through space-time that is the cause of gravity. I believe that the movement of mass causes a 'wake' or gap in space-time that forces other mass to try and take the place of the moved mass causing the gravitational attraction. I have come to think this, because of Einstein's relativity theory, string theory, the 'Bozon' particle theory, and the fact that everything that has gravity is moving. The best way to illustrate this would be- if you were to draw a paddle through water, other water will take the place of the water you moved. Does anyone have any thoughts/insights into this?

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  • May 9 2012: The other reason why this wouldn't work is because of the Quantum Field theory. This is probably the biggest obstacle because an object going at a constant velocity would undergo changes in gravitational pull due to quantum fluctuations in the amount of dimensions in the universe (as stated by the M-theory and string theory). This couldn't work with your theory because as I stated above in order to make your current theory apply to observations the amount of gravitational pull would have to be relative to the amount of motion in the object due to general relativity (I realize that E=mc2 has been proven false by the neutrino however the concept of a relationship between mass and energy based on a constant integer is still relevant). This flaw would be much more difficult to work out however if you did work it out your theory would be much better suited to fit into current theories of the universe.
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      Dave R

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      May 9 2012: I don't mean movement as a whole, like a planet moving through space.. Universally, it would have be the measure of the movement on the sub-atomic level (like the periodic table of elements) and then compounded to the amount of mass as a total. So a planet could remain "motionless" but still have gravity because of the activity on the quantum level..
      • May 10 2012: That could fix the reference point problem but quantum fluctuations could still occur on a sub-atomic level. Also how would your theory react to a change in the coupling constant of the strings making up the matter (i.e an electron turns into an electric monopole which doesn't nessecarily move but stills contains has a small gravitational field?
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          Dave R

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          May 10 2012: Is gravity an absolute constant?
      • May 10 2012: Not necessarily because in the quantum field theory if your in part of the universe with different amounts of unraveled dimensions then not only does it change the coupling constant but it also changes the gravitational force. It's a pretty simple formula though

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